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The latest orthopaedic news from Medical News Today and local news publishers.

Depression is a medical condition that causes a person to experience feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of motivation.   More than just a temporary case of the blues, depression can be long-lasting. It may affect a person's ability to perform daily activities, and can lead to thoughts of suicide. One of the hallmark symptoms associated with depression is persistent lack of motivation. Without the desire or willingness to complete regular tasks, a person can sink more deeply into their depression. The underlying issues that accompany depression need to be addressed first and then lifestyle and wellness measures can be used to help an individual with depression live a more motivated life.

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Here are five highlights: 1. The invite-only society encompasses fewer than 700 surgeons. 2. Physicians are elected based on the number of shoulder and elbow surgeries performed, publications, fellowship training and reputation. 3. Dr. Garbis, an orthopedic surgery assistant professor at Maywood, Ill.-based Loyola Medicine, specializes in minimally invasive arthroscopic shoulder and elbow surgery, elbow and shoulder disorders, shoulder replacement and sports medicine. 4. He treats rotator cuff tears, joint arthritis and overuse injuries as well as tennis elbow ant arthritis.

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University of Iowa Health Care researchers report that the results of a study of injury rates in youth football leagues did not show that flag football is safer than tackle football. Concerns about the rate of concussions among athletes and the long term effects of repeated head injuries lead to discussion that children under the age of 12 should not participate in contact sports such as tackle football. The UI researchers studied three large youth football leagues with almost 3,800 participants. The research team compared the number of injuries, severe injuries, and concussions in players competing on flag football teams and tackle football squads.

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Evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a potential cause of dementia caused by repeated blows to the head, has been found in the brains of former association football (soccer) players examined at the UCL Queen Square Brain Bank. The study, funded by The Drake Foundation and published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica, looked at 14 retired footballers with dementia who were referred to the Old Age Psychiatry Service in Swansea, Wales, between 1980 and 2010. Permission from their next-of-kin was provided to perform post-mortem examinations, which were carried out in six ex-players. Post-mortem analysis of the brain was carried out by researchers from UCL and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

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Low back pain affects millions of people in the United States, and the condition is one of the most common reasons for people missing work. New guidelines from the American College of Physicians recommend noninvasive ways of treating nonradicular low back pain. The new treatment recommendations from the American College of Physicians include massage, acupuncture, tai chi, and yoga. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) report that approximately 31 million U.S. individuals experience low back pain at one point during their lives. The ACA also note that low back pain is the leading cause of disability across the world, as well as one of the most popular reasons why people miss work.

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Jock itch is an annoying and itchy rash common in people who sweat a lot, such as athletes. The rash is often found in the genital, buttock, and thigh regions. Although uncomfortable, jock itch is not serious and can be treated and prevented very easily. Jock itch is an infection caused by a mold like fungus or yeast. It causes a rash on the areas around the groin. The red, ring-shaped rash is very itchy and thrives in these warm, moist areas of the body.   The rash is caused by the same fungus that causes athlete's foot, tinea cruris.

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Patients with Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes abdominal pain and diarrhea, can also experience joint pain. In Crohn's disease, which affects about 800,000 Americans, the immune system can attack not only the bowels, but the musculoskeletal system as well, leading to spondyloarthritis, a painful condition that affects the spine and joints. Now new research, published in Science Translational Medicine, helps explain the connection between these seemingly unrelated symptoms, and could help physicians identify Crohn's disease patients who are more likely to develop spondyloarthritis, enabling them to prescribe more effective therapies for both conditions.

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These tabs require JavaScript to be enabled. 5 good foods for gout. Retrieved from http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/gout/articles/low-purine-diet.php Choi, H. K., Atkinson, K., Karlson, E. W., Willett, W., & Curhan, G. (2004, March 11). Purine-rich foods, dairy and protein intake, and the risk of gout in men. New England Journal of Medicine, 350, 1093-1103. Retrieved from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa035700#t=article Dalbeth, N., Merriman, T. R., & Stamp, L. K. (2016, October 22). Gout. The Lancet, 388(10055), 2039-2052. Retrieved from http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)00346-9/abstract Gout - introduction. (2015, September 24). Retrieved from http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/gout/Pages/Introduction.aspx Gout self care. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/gout/self-care.php

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Traumatic brain injury in a serious health concern, especially among children and adolescents. New research uncovers the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury on children. New research investigates the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury in children, as well as the importance of home and family environment in facilitating recovery. A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is any injury to the head that interferes with the normal functioning of the brain. This can be a violent blow or bump, which can result in a sudden jolt, or a penetrating injury that pierces the skull and the brain tissue.

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In a study of hip fracture patients, men displayed greater levels of cognitive impairment within the first 22 days of fracture than women, and cognitive limitations increased the risk of dying within six months in both men and women. "While men make up only about 25 percent of all hip fractures, the number of men who fracture their hip is increasing and we know men are more likely to die than women after a hip fracture," said Dr. Ann Gruber-Baldini, lead author of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study. "It is also known that those with cognitive impairments, typically due to delirium and Alzheimer's disease and related dementia, are more likely than women to do poorly after the fracture.

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