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In particular, Dr. Cunningham conducts ACL reconstruction, partial and total knee replacements and cartilage restoration surgery. He uses cadaver and autologous chongrocyte implants in patients who have lost their meniscus or articular cartilage. He serves as a U.S. Ski Team physician and is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Arthroscopy Association of North America and Colorado Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Cunningham graduated from Seattle-based University of Washington School of Medicine before completing a general surgery internship and orthopedic surgery residency at Salt Lake City-based University of Utah School of Medicine.

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The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years. "Overweight and obesity is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and it is recommended to lose weight," said author Dr Klodian Dhana, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

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Fibromyalgia is a medical condition that is characterized by widespread pain throughout the body. The condition is long-term, although the severity of symptoms can vary. There may be times when symptoms are mild and other times when symptoms are severe. According to the Mayo Clinic, researchers think that fibromyalgia may develop due to changes in the way the brain processes and recognizes pain. Although not everything is completely understood about the condition, it is thought that changes in certain brain chemicals may lead to a chemical imbalance.

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An in-depth computational analysis of genetic variants implicated in both schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh points to eight genes that may explain why susceptibility to one of the disorders could place individuals at lower risk for the other, according to the results of a study published in the journal npj Schizophrenia. "There is a wealth of genomic data on both schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis. Analyzing it jointly with known protein interaction information could provide invaluable clues to the relationship between the diseases and also shed light on their shared roots," said Madhavi Ganapathiraju Ph.D.

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High BMI and reduced physical activity are both known risk factors for heart failure. A recent study investigates the impact of these factors on a specific subtype: heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.BMI and exercise influence heart failure subtypes differently, the new study shows. When the heart is no longer able to pump enough blood to meet the body's oxygen demands, it is referred to as heart failure - a chronic and progressive condition. An estimated 5.7 million adults in the United States have heart failure. In fact, heart failure was responsible for 1 in 9 deaths in the U.S.

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The 600,000 older Australians who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain, the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. Low back pain is a major problem, ranked as the highest contributor to disability in the world. Nearly four million people in Australia suffer from low back pain and the total cost of treatment exceeds $1 billion a year.

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Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that is associated with significant cosmetic and physical disability and puts patients at increased risk for many major medical disorders. A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Calgary, Canada, have found that psoriasis patients who developed depression were at a 37% greater risk of subsequently developing psoriatic arthritis, compared with psoriasis patients who did not develop depression. Their findings are published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Psoriasis is a long-lasting inflammatory skin disease characterized by red, itchy, and scaly patches of skin.

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Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee frequently leads to early-onset osteoarthritis, a painful condition that can occur even if the patient has undergone ACL reconstruction to prevent its onset. A new review looks at the ability of two different reconstruction techniques to restore normal knee motion and potentially slow degenerative changes. The findings suggest that where a graft is placed on the femur is crucial for restoring joint function and knee motion and for preventing cartilage from thinning, a degenerative change associated with osteoarthritis. "ACL injury can age the knee by an estimated 30 years," said Dr.

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New evidence suggests that receiving low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to speed up bone healing after fracture has little or no impact on pain or recovery time, say a panel of international experts in The BMJ. They say LIPUS does not represent an efficient use of health resources and recommend that it should be stopped. Their advice is part of The BMJ's 'Rapid Recommendations' initiative - to produce rapid and trustworthy guidance based on new evidence to help doctors make better decisions with their patients.

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Emergency patients treated with naproxen and placebo had outcomes as good as or better than patients treated with naproxen and diazepam (trade name Valium) for acute lower back pain, according to the results of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. "Our study contributes to the growing body of literature indicating that, in general, most medications do not improve acute lower back pain," said lead study author Benjamin Friedman, MD, MS, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Health System in Bronx, New York.

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