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The latest orthopaedic news from Medical News Today and local news publishers.

Researchers at the University of Granada warn that 23 percent of the girls carry in their backpack or trolley a load over 20 percent of their body weight, well above what is recommended Researchers at the University of Granada (UGR) belonging to the Joint University Institute for Sports and Health (Instituto Mixto Universitario Deporte y Salud, iMUDS), have scientifically proven that trolleys are more beneficial than backpacks for children's gait, and it does less damage to their backs. The research involved a total of 78 schoolchildren aged 6 to 12, 43 girls and 35 boys, belonging to public schools in Granada.

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1. OFAR is a patient-reported outcome data collection system that uses the M2S Pathways clinical data platform to track outcomes for most orthopedic foot and ankle conditions. 2. OFAR is expected to increase data availability to improve foot and ankle patient care and increase outcomes research in the process. 3. Hospitals, practices and individual providers will use the data to understand common foot and ankle surgical procedures and treatments and compare their performance with national benchmarks. 4. Patient data will be entered into OFAR's pilot registry beginning in mid-2017.

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Between 3 and 5% of the population suffer from a form of inflammatory rheumatism. It affects approximately 250,000 - 400,000 people in Austria. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the commonest and also the most dangerous forms of this inflammatory rheumatic disease. Around 30% of patients achieve remission, that is to say successful control of symptoms, after just one or two years. However, despite frequent changes in treatment, many other patients have to endure the active form of the disease on an ongoing basis. A multicentre, multinational study headed up by rheumatologist Daniel Aletaha of MedUni Vienna as principal investigator has now shown that a new drug (sirukumab) is a very promising treatment option for these "refractory" patients.

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For patients with cancer-related fatigue, exercise is likely to be last on the list of appealing activities. According to a new study, however, physical activity is the best way to combat this common side effect.Researchers have found that exercise is one of the best ways to reduce fatigue for cancer patients. Researchers compared a variety of treatments for cancer-related fatigue to find that exercise or psychological interventions fared best, while drug treatments were less effective. Based on their findings, the authors suggest that doctors should recommend exercise or psychological therapies to patients with cancer-related fatigue in the first instance, rather than turning to medications.

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He specializes in treating total ankle replacements, arthroscopic techniques and sports-related conditions in athletes. Dr. Gay currently serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Exercise, Sports & Orthopaedics and is co-founder and chairman of the board of SimpleTherapy. Dr. Gay graduated from Houston-based Baylor College of Medicine, completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and underwent his lower extremity reconstruction fellowship with Roger Mann, MD, in Oakland, Calif. Dr. Gay is a featured speaker at the Becker's 15th Annual Spine, Orthopedic and Pain Management-Driven ASC Conference + The Future of Spine, June 22 to 24, 2017 in Chicago.

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Walking, running, sprinting - every movement of the foot stretches the Achilles' tendon. When jumping, the loads can approach ten times the body weight. Amazingly, the connection between the heel bone and Achilles' tendon withstands theses tremendous loads. A team of doctors, physicists, chemists and engineers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered why. Some 8000 torn Achilles' tendons are treated in Germany every year. And that even though it is the strongest tendon in the human body. It connects the ankle bone to the calf muscle and holds up to ten times the body's weight.

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A type of drug used to treat weak bones is associated with an increased risk of 'micro-cracks' in bone, according to new research. The early-stage research, by scientists at Imperial College London, suggests these microcracks may reduce mechanical strength of the bone. In the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers studied bone samples from 16 people who had been diagnosed with the weak bone condition osteoporosis. All of the patients had suffered a broken hip, and half of the patients had been taking a type of commonly-prescribed drug called bisphosphonate.

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A recent large-scale study concludes that individuals with autoimmune conditions may have an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. Although the effect size is relatively small, if the findings are replicated, they will have important clinical implications.Conditions where the immune system attacks healthy cells might increase dementia risk. Dementias are a range of conditions, the most prevalent of which is Alzheimer's. They are characterized by a progressive loss of memory function and other cognitive skills, eventually leading to an inability to perform everyday activities. Currently, an estimated 47.5 million people are living with dementia, worldwide.

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The anxiety experienced by elite athletes over illness symptoms is linked to the risk of being injured during competition and should be taken seriously, according to a study carried out at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2015. The way in which the symptoms progress and the nature of the sporting activity also influence the risk of injury. "Elite athletes know their own bodies extremely well. If an athlete becomes anxious about injury or illness, this is a reliable indicator of the degree of seriousness. We have seen this also in previous studies. An athlete cannot lie to himself or herself," says Toomas Timpka of the Athletic Research Center, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences at Linköping University, one of the researchers who conducted the study.

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A study led by the University of Granada (UGR) has shown that doping is not only a problem exclusive to professional sports, but also occurs in amateur sports. In an article published in The Sport Psychologist journal, researchers warn that it is necessary to increase control over the doping problem also in popular cycling, conducting campaigns to raise awareness and prevent the consumption of performance-enhancement drugs (PEDs). The team of scientists who carried out this work is made up of researchers from the universities of Granada and Elche, in addition to the Spanish Cycling Federation. To do this, they investigated the relationship between the use of performance-enhancement substances (measured by an anonymous questionnaire) and a number of psychosocial variables: attitude towards doping, self-esteem, self-efficacy and perception of doping substances among cyclists (false consensus effect).

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