Shoulder and Elbow

Latest journal articles about shoulder and elbow from Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, The Bone & Joint Journal, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Acta Orthopaedica, Orthopedic Clinics of North, America, Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, Orthopedics

Related Articles Long-term clinical outcomes, motion, strength, and function after total claviculectomy. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 10; Authors: Rubright J, Kelleher P, Beardsley C, Paller D, Shackford S, Beynnon B, Shafritz A Abstract BACKGROUND: Total excision of the clavicle is rarely performed. No previous study has documented long-term outcomes with objective measurements of strength, motion, and patient-centered outcomes. We present the long-term consequences of total claviculectomy on shoulder girdle function, global upper extremity function, and overall general health. METHODS: Five total claviculectomy patients were evaluated at 2 time points (2005 and 2010, mean 4.8 and 9.4 years postoperatively) by use of the DASH, SF-36, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, HSS, and Constant shoulder scores. Isokinetic strength, clinical range of motion, and kinematic analysis were performed on each limb pair.

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Related Articles Acute lateral dislocated clavicular fractures: arthroscopic stabilization with TightRope. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 9; Authors: Motta P, Bruno L, Maderni A, Tosco P, Mariotti U Abstract HYPOTHESIS: Type IIA, IIB, and V lateral clavicular fractures (Craig modification of the Neer classification) are characterized by a constant displacement and are associated with a high rate of nonunion. The aim of this study is to verify whether the reduction and arthroscopic stabilization of these clavicular fractures with coracoclavicular cerclage provide stable fixation to allow for bone healing. To date, the treatment of these fractures is still controversial in young active patients in whom functional requirements are to be met. METHODS: Fourteen male patients, with type IIA, IIB, and V lateral clavicular fractures (2 type IIA, 10 type IIB, and 2 type V) had been treated arthroscopically with a TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) and had a radiologic/clinical follow-up of at least 2 years.

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Related Articles Limb function after excision of a deltoid muscle sarcoma. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 9; Authors: Mimata Y, Nishida J, Gotoh M, Akasaka T, Shimamura T Abstract BACKGROUND: Limb function after excision of deltoid muscle sarcomas has not been thoroughly investigated, although a large defect of soft tissue often causes some degree of dysfunction after wide excision. We formulated a hypothesis that the limb functional results depend on the volume of the excised deltoid muscle and examined the clinical outcomes in patients with a sarcoma in the deltoid muscle treated by surgical resection. METHODS: The clinical outcomes of 8 patients with a malignant soft tissue tumor in the deltoid muscle were retrospectively reviewed. The following items were evaluated: type of excision of the deltoid muscle, including total excision, subtotal excision, and partial excision; surgical margins; reconstruction procedure used; postoperative complications; local recurrence; metastasis; survival; and functional results (determined by the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system).

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Related Articles Shoulder arthroplasty for osteoarthritis secondary to glenoid dysplasia: an update. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 9; Authors: Allen B, Schoch B, Sperling JW, Cofield RH Abstract BACKGROUND: Glenoid component fixation is an issue in shoulder arthroplasty for glenoid dysplasia with osteoarthritis because of the small amount of bone available. In 2002, we described 6 patients (7 shoulders) undergoing shoulder arthroplasty for this condition. This report expands that experience to further understand the role of anatomic shoulder arthroplasty (both hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty), to outline results, and to identify complications and reoperations-all to better understand whether other treatment options need to be developed and explored. Our hypothesis is that treatment of this problem with anatomic arthroplasty is not ideal. METHODS: Between 1980 and 2008, 20 patients (22 shoulders) underwent anatomic shoulder arthroplasty for treatment of osteoarthritis secondary to glenoid dysplasia. There were 8 hemiarthroplasties and 14 total shoulder arthroplasties. Average follow-up was 6 years (range, 0.4 to 23.1 years).

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Related Articles Characteristics of small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears with and without disruption of the anterior supraspinatus tendon. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 9; Authors: Namdari S, Donegan RP, Dahiya N, Galatz LM, Yamaguchi K, Keener JD Abstract BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the baseline function and results of arthroscopic cuff repair in shoulders with small and medium-sized full-thickness cuff tears with complete supraspinatus disruption compared with those with an intact anterior supraspinatus tendon. METHODS: The study evaluated 112 subjects with small and medium-sized cuff tears. Subjects were grouped according to anterior supraspinatus integrity (83 shoulders intact, group 1; and 29 shoulders with anterior supraspinatus tendon disruption, group 2). Functional assessments included visual analogue scale for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test score, and Constant score. Repair integrity was assessed by ultrasound examination. RESULTS: Group 2 shoulders had greater mean tear width, length, and area (P < .0001) and greater supraspinatus muscle degenerative changes (P < .0001) compared with shoulders with an intact anterior supraspinatus tendon. There were no differences in demographics or baseline function (ASES score: 45 group 1 vs 46 group 2, P = .79; Constant score: 56 group 1 vs 52 group 2, P = .29) before surgery. There were no differences in any

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Related Articles AO X-shaped Midfoot Locking Plate to Treat Displaced Isolated Greater Tuberosity Fractures. Orthopedics. 2013 Aug 1;36(8):e995-9 Authors: Chen YF, Zhang W, Chen Q, Wei HF, Wang L, Zhang CQ Abstract Although various implants exist for 3- and 4-part fractures, few implants are appropriate for isolated greater tuberosity fractures. This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of AO X-shaped midfoot locking plates for greater tuberosity fractures. Between May 2008 and September 2009, nineteen patients with displaced greater tuberosity fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using AO X-shaped midfoot locking plates. Postoperatively, radiographs, functional results, and complications were evaluated. All patients were followed up for a mean 33.2 months (range, 24-42 months). Mean healing time was 9.4 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). Mean Constant score was 90.6±4.0 points (range, 77-95 points). Excellent results were obtained in 16 cases, good in 2 cases, moderate in 1 case, and poor in 0 cases. The excellent-good rate was 94.7%. No recurrence of dislocation occurred in the 11 cases with shoulder dislocation. All fractures healed without the complications of wound infection, skin numbness, subacromial impingement syndrome, nonunion, secondary displacement, and implant loosening. The described technique is an effective, simple, and inexpensive method with a short learning curve. PMID: 23937765 [PubMed - in process]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23937765?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles Biomechanical Evaluation of Anatomical Double-bundle Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction Secured With Knot Fixation Versus Screw Fixation. Orthopedics. 2013 Aug 1;36(8):e1047-52 Authors: Staron JS, Esquivel AO, Pandhi NG, Hanna JD, Lemos SE Abstract

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Related Articles Minimally Invasive Plating Osteosynthesis for Mid-distal Third Humeral Shaft Fractures. Orthopedics. 2013 Aug 1;36(8):e1025-32 Authors: Lian K, Wang L, Lin D, Chen Z Abstract

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Related Articles Occupational injury among orthopaedic surgeons. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Aug 7;95(15):e1071-6 Authors: Davis WT, Sathiyakumar V, Jahangir AA, Obremskey WT, Sethi MK Abstract BACKGROUND: Orthopaedic surgery is a physically demanding profession that requires many hours per week in body positions known to contribute to musculoskeletal injury and pain. Injuries to surgeons can affect the delivery of care and impose costs on the health care system. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and types of injuries sustained at the workplace during the career of an orthopaedic surgeon as well as the impact of such injuries on practicing surgeons. METHODS: A survey was developed to assess occupational injury among orthopaedic surgeons. Electronic surveys were distributed via e-mail to all orthopaedic surgeons in Tennessee. Data were analyzed to determine statistical associations of demographic and workplace factors with the rate of injury.

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Related Articles Clinical presentation of posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow in children. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Aug 7;95(15):e105-7 Authors: Lattanza LL, Goldfarb CA, Smucny M, Hutchinson DT Abstract BACKGROUND: Posterolateral rotatory instability is a type of ulnohumeral instability seen following elbow trauma. It is caused by a deficiency in the lateral collateral ligament complex that allows the radius and ulna to subluxate as a single unit with respect to the distal part of the humerus. There are few studies on this type of instability in children. Our purpose was to evaluate cases of posterolateral rotatory instability in children to better understand its presentation and manifestation as compared with those in adults. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of patients from three academic centers. Eligible for inclusion were patients with a diagnosis of posterolateral rotatory instability who were treated with lateral ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction when they were less than nineteen years of age.

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