Shoulder and Elbow

Latest journal articles about shoulder and elbow from Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, The Bone & Joint Journal, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Acta Orthopaedica, Orthopedic Clinics of North, America, Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, Orthopedics

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Surgical Treatment Your doctor may recommend surgery to take pressure off of the nerve if:Nonsurgical methods have not improved your conditionThe ulnar nerve is very compressedNerve compression has caused muscle weakness or damageThere are a few surgical procedures that will relieve pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Your orthopaedic surgeon will talk with you about the option that would be best for you. These procedures are most often done on an outpatient basis, but some patients do best with an overnight stay at the hospital. Cubital tunnel release. In this operation, the ligament "roof" of the cubital tunnel is cut and divided.

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BACKGROUND: Increased length of hospital stay, hospital readmission, and revision surgery are adverse outcomes that increase the cost of elective orthopaedic procedures, such as shoulder arthroplasty. Awareness of the factors related to these adverse outcomes will help surgeons and medical centers design strategies for minimizing their occurrence and for managing their associated costs. METHODS: We analyzed data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System on 17,311 primary shoulder arthroplasties performed from 1998 to 2011 to identify factors associated with extended lengths of hospitalization after surgery, readmission within ninety days, and surgical revision. RESULTS: The factors associated with each of these three adverse outcomes were different.

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BACKGROUND: Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis is defined as a frozen shoulder with severe and global range-of-motion loss of unknown etiology. The purpose of our study was to clarify the prevalence of rotator cuff lesions according to patterns and severity of range-of-motion loss in a large cohort of patients with stiff shoulders. METHODS: Rotator cuff pathology was prospectively investigated with use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography in a series of 379 stiff shoulders; patients with traumatic etiology, diabetes, or radiographic abnormalities were excluded. Eighty-nine shoulders demonstrated severe and global loss of passive motion (≤100° of forward flexion, ≤10° of external rotation with the arm at the side, and internal rotation not more cephalad than the L5 level) and were classified as having severe and global loss of motion (Group 1).

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Related Articles Outcome of surgical reconstruction after traumatic total brachial plexus palsy. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Aug 21;95(16):1505-12 Authors: Dodakundi C, Doi K, Hattori Y, Sakamoto S, Fujihara Y, Takagi T, Fukuda M Abstract BACKGROUND: Double free muscle transfer for the treatment of traumatic total brachial plexus injury provides useful prehensile function. We studied the outcome of this muscle transfer procedure, including the changes in disability and quality-of-life scores. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with traumatic total brachial plexus injury who underwent double free muscle transfer for reconstruction from 2002 to 2008 and had a minimum follow-up of twenty-four months after the second free muscle transfer were studied. All were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with use of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires. A separate questionnaire was used to determine job status, pain, use of the reconstructed hand, and satisfaction with the procedure.

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Related Articles Arthroscopic repair of massive contracted rotator cuff tears: aggressive release with anterior and posterior interval slides do not improve cuff healing and integrity. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Aug 21;95(16):1482-8 Authors: Kim SJ, Kim SH, Lee SK, Seo JW, Chun YM Abstract BACKGROUND: Few studies of large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears have examined the arthroscopic complete repair obtained by a posterior interval slide and whether the clinical outcomes or structural integrity achieved are better than those after partial repair without the posterior interval slide. METHOD: The study included forty-one patients with large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears, not amenable to complete repair with margin convergence alone. The patients underwent either arthroscopic complete repair with a posterior interval slide and side-to-side repair of the interval slide edge (twenty-two patients; Group P) or partial repair with margin convergence (nineteen patients; Group M). The patient assignment was not randomized. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and range of motion were used to compare the functional outcomes. Preoperative and six-month postoperative magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images were compared within or between groups. RESULTS: At the two-year follow-up evaluation, the SST, ASES score, UCLA score, and range of motion had significantly improved (p < 0.001 for all) in both groups. However, no significant differences were detected between groups. Even though the difference in preoperative tear size on

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Related Articles Electromyographic analysis of reverse total shoulder arthroplasties. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013 Aug 14; Authors: Walker D, Wright TW, Banks SA, Struk AM Abstract BACKGROUND: Understanding how reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) affects muscle activation may help refine it. This study evaluated deltoid and upper trapezius activity during shoulder abduction, flexion, and external rotation in RTSA recipients. METHODS: Fifty individuals were recruited for this study: 33 were ≥6 months postunilateral RSTA, and 17 comprised our control group. Control individuals easily performed all functional tasks and had no history of shoulder pathology or pain. RTSA participants were divided into 3 groups according to implant design. Participants performed weighted and unweighted abduction in the coronal plane, forward flexion in the sagittal plane, and unweighted external rotation. Electromyography activation of the anterior, lateral, and posterior aspects of the deltoid and the upper trapezius muscles was recorded bilaterally. Motion capture using passive reflective markers quantified 3-dimensional motions of both shoulders.

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Related Articles Radial head fractures. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Jun 19;95(12):1136-43 Authors: Lapner M, King GJ PMID: 23943926 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23943926?dopt=Abstract