Shoulder and Elbow

Latest journal articles about shoulder and elbow from Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, The Bone & Joint Journal, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Acta Orthopaedica, Orthopedic Clinics of North, America, Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, Orthopedics

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Aseptic loosening of the glenoid component is the most common complication in anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, and improper placement of the glenoid component is an important yet controllable cause of this complication. The literature shows that even experienced surgeons are often inaccurate when using radiographs, CT scans, and standard instrumentation for positioning of the glenoid component, particularly in shoulder joints with more severe pathology. The surgeon can more accurately place the glenoid component in the desired location using advanced techniques and tools, such as three-dimensional preoperative planning and templating, patient-specific instrumentation, and computer-assisted navigation. However, although these tools improve the accuracy of placement of the glenoid component, further work is needed to define its optimal position in cases of acquired and/or developmental bone loss.

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Editor's Pick Management of Humeral Shaft Fractures With Intramedullary Interlocking Nail Versus Locking Compression Plate. Fan Y, Li YW, Zhang HB, Liu JF, Han XM, Chang X, Weng XS, Lin J, Zhang BZ. Orthopedics. 2015 Sep 1;38(9):e825-9. doi: 10.3928/01477447-20150902-62.

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This study compared the clinical outcomes following mini-open rotator cuff repair (MORCR) between early mobilisation and usual care, involving initial immobilisation. In total, 189 patients with radiologically-confirmed full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent MORCR and were randomised to either early mobilisation (n = 97) or standard rehabilitation (n = 92) groups. Patients were assessed at six weeks and three, six, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. Six-week range of movement comparisons demonstrated significantly increased abduction (p = 0.002) and scapular plane elevation (p = 0.006) in the early mobilisation group, an effect which was not detectable at three months (p > 0.51) or afterwards.

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BACKGROUND: Neglected osseous glenoid defects are thought to be one of the reasons for the reported high rates of recurrent instability at long-term follow-up after Bankart repair. We hypothesized that open Bankart repair for the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability in the absence of a substantial osseous glenoid defect would result in a lower long-term recurrence rate than has been reported in previous long-term studies. METHODS: Forty-seven patients were treated with a primary modified open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1989 and 1994. Double-contrast computed tomography scanning was used to exclude patients with a substantial osseous glenoid defect.

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BACKGROUND: The shoulder's ability to participate in sports and activities of daily living depends on its active range of motion. Clinical goniometry is of limited utility in rigorously assessing limitation of motion and the effectiveness of treatment. We sought to determine (1) whether a validated position-sensing tool, the Kinect, can enable the objective clinical measurement of shoulder motion and (2) the degree to which active range of motion correlates with patient self-assessed shoulder function. METHODS: In 10 control subjects, we compared Kinect motion measurements to measurements made on standardized anteroposterior and lateral photographs taken concurrently. In 51 patients, we correlated active motion with the ability to perform the functions of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST).

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BACKGROUND: The radial nerve is at risk after diaphyseal humeral fracture or surgery to repair the fracture. We hypothesized that there are no factors associated with iatrogenic radial nerve palsy and, secondarily, that there are no factors associated with traumatic radial nerve palsy or radial nerve palsy of any type. METHODS: We analyzed 325 adult patients who underwent operative treatment of a diaphyseal humerus fracture at 6 hospitals between January 2002 and November 2014 to determine factors associated with a radial nerve palsy. We excluded patients with pathologic fractures, fractures with massive bone loss, prior surgery in another hospital, periprosthetic fractures, and if no operative note was available.

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BACKGROUND: Neglected osseous glenoid defects are thought to be one of the reasons for the reported high rates of recurrent instability at long-term follow-up after Bankart repair. We hypothesized that open Bankart repair for the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability in the absence of a substantial osseous glenoid defect would result in a lower long-term recurrence rate than has been reported in previous long-term studies. METHODS: Forty-seven patients were treated with a primary modified open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1989 and 1994. Double-contrast computed tomography scanning was used to exclude patients with a substantial osseous glenoid defect.

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