Orthopedic News for Patients - Bone & Joint Pain

News for patients with orthopedic conditions & bone and joint pain.

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans have suffered through an ankle break or sprain, but new research suggests these injuries might have a larger effect on health. The study, based on a survey of thousands of adults, found that people with injured ankles tend to have higher rates of disability and arthritis, heart or respiratory issues going forward. The study can't prove cause-and-effect, but it points to the importance of proper rehabilitation after such injuries, the researchers said. "What is concerning is these differences are presenting across the life span -- especially during the critical middle age years when our risk for these diseases begins to increase," said study author Phillip Gribble.

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FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Minimally invasive hip surgery may not always be the best option to relieve serious, ongoing hip pain, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than one-third of people in their 60s who had the minimally invasive procedure -- known as hip arthroscopy -- ended up needing a hip replacement within two years. Hip arthroscopy relies on small incisions around the hip to allow for the insertion of a tiny camera, as well as surgical tools, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Hip arthroscopy can be used to treat a number of painful conditions, the AAOS says.

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WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal fusion surgery is too often used to treat lower back pain when a simpler procedure would suffice for many patients, according to a pair of new clinical trials. People suffering from spinal stenosis -- pinched nerves caused by a narrowing of the spinal canal -- received similar pain relief with fewer complications when doctors performed a simpler spine surgery called decompression, as opposed to a full-fledged spinal fusion, a study from Sweden found. "Fusion was associated with longer operating time, longer hospital stay and was more expensive than decompression alone," said lead researcher Dr.

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THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill.

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By Mayo Clinic Staff Knee replacement surgery — also known as knee arthroplasty (ARTH-row-plas-tee) — can help relieve pain and restore function in severely diseased knee joints. During knee replacement, a surgeon cuts away damaged bone and cartilage from your thighbone, shinbone and kneecap and replaces it with an artificial joint made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics and polymers. The first artificial knees were little more than crude hinges. Now, you and your doctor can choose from a variety of designs that take into account your age, weight, activity level and overall health. Most knee replacement joints attempt to act like your knee, with its ability to roll and glide as it bends.

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MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, a new study looks East for relief -- to the martial art tai chi. Researchers concluded that tai chi offers an alternative to physical therapy for common knee osteoarthritis -- and it might also boost well-being. This ancient Chinese exercise may particularly benefit overweight older adults, the researchers said. Heavier people are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than people with a healthy weight, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplements didn't relieve pain or slow the progression of knee osteoarthritis in a new study, even though the patients involved had low levels of the vitamin. Osteoarthritis is a progressive disease, and currently no treatment is available that will stop the loss of cartilage. Eventually, many patients are headed for knee replacements, the Australian researchers said. "These data suggest a lack of evidence to support vitamin D supplementation for slowing disease progression or structural change in knee osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Changhai Ding, a professor at the University of Tasmania in Hobart.

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SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There could be a downside to knee replacement: As people get more active, their odds for hip and spinal fractures rise, a new study suggests. One expert wasn't surprised by the finding. While the exact reason for the increase in hip and spine fractures isn't clear, it's most likely due "to improved mobility and activity as a result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In addition, patients who chose to have the surgery rather than conservative management of osteoarthritis may have been the same individuals who were determined to lead very active and therefore somewhat riskier lifestyles in the future," said Messer, who directs the hospital's Center for Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Disorders.

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FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Surgeons often recommend outpatient physical therapy to help hip replacement patients get moving again, but researchers report that a home exercise program may work just as well. Experts say that physical therapy plays a vital role in recovery after hip replacement. And this new study of 77 patients found they obtained similar results no matter which therapy option they pursued after receiving their new hip. "Our research found that the physical therapy does not necessarily need to be supervised by a physical therapist [for hip replacement patients]," said study author Dr.

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