Sports Medicine

Latest journal articles about sports medicine and arthroscopy from Sports Medicine, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, British Journal of Sports Medicine, Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review, International Journal of Sports Medicine, Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, The Bone & Joint Journal, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Acta Orthopaedica, Orthopedic Clinics of North, America, Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, Orthopedics

Related Articles Surgical options for patellar stabilization in the skeletally immature patient. Sports Med Arthrosc. 2012 Sep;20(3):194-202 Authors: Weeks KD, Fabricant PD, Ladenhauf HN, Green DW Abstract Patella dislocation is a common injury in children and adolescents and occurs at a rate of 29 to 43 per 100,000 among the 10- to 17-year-olds. The variety and types of patellar instability seen in a pediatric orthopedic population may differ slightly from those seen in an adult clinic. Four main types of pediatric patellar instability exist and include: posttraumatic, syndromic, obligatory,and fixed. Over 100 surgical techniques have been proposed to treat the various types of patellar instability. This review intends to discuss the techniques and outcomes of surgical reconstructions accepted and utilized in the skeletally immature patients. PMID: 23882722 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882722?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles The IOC Diploma programme in sports medicine. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Maughan RJ, Engebretsen L, Soligard T, Budgett R PMID: 23881897 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881897?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles Imaging at London 2012 summer Olympic Games: analysis of demand and distribution of workload. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Bethapudi S, Budgett R, Engebretsen L, O'Connor P Abstract BACKGROUND: Very little data on the provision of imaging services at the summer Olympic Games have been published before. With 7.9 million Euros (£6.6 million, US$11 million) invested into setting up the imaging equipment at the purpose-built polyclinics for London 2012 summer Olympics, an ideal opportunity was presented to study the demand and distribution of workload on imaging services at the games. SETTING: Imaging services within polyclinics, London 2012 summer Olympic Games. AIMS: To analyse the demand and distribution of workload on radiology services at the London 2012 summer Olympic Games. METHODS: Data on radiological investigations performed at London 2012 summer Olympic Games were retrieved from Radiology Information System-picture archiving communication system, ATOS medical encounter database and analysed. RESULTS: 1711 diagnostic and interventional procedures were performed at the Stratford Polyclinic within the main games village. Of these 48.8% were MRI scans, 20.2% were diagnostic ultrasound examinations, 23.6% were plain radiographs, 2.9% were CT scans and interventional procedures accounted for 4.3%. Nearly 75% of imaging was performed on athletes while less than 5% of the services were utilised by the workforce. Demand on radiology services peaked during week 2 of the games.

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Related Articles Getting Scotland on the move? Reflections on a 5-year review of Scotland's national physical activity strategy. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Halliday E, Mutrie N, Bull F Abstract The public health risks of physical inactivity have led many national governments to develop policies that aim to increase population levels of physical activity. There is however, little evidence available about the effectiveness of such strategies and physical activity leaders may also face challenges in securing sufficient levels of political will and lasting investment for physical activity. This article reports on a review of a national physical activity strategy in Scotland after 5 years of implementation and offers lessons that may assist policymakers, practitioners and communities seeking to mobilise political commitment and leadership for physical activity in their own countries. PMID: 23881895 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881895?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles Consensus criteria for defining 'successful outcome' after ACL injury and reconstruction: a Delaware-Oslo ACL cohort investigation. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Lynch AD, Logerstedt DS, Grindem H, Eitzen I, Hicks GE, Axe MJ, Engebretsen L, Risberg MA, Snyder-Mackler L Abstract BACKGROUND: No gold standard exists for identifying successful outcomes 1 and 2 years after operative and non-operative management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This limits the ability of a researcher and clinicians to compare and contrast the results of interventions. PURPOSE: To establish a consensus based on expert consensus of measures that define successful outcomes 1 and 2 years after ACL injury or reconstruction. METHODS: Members of international sports medicine associations, including the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, the European Society for Sports Traumatology, Surgery, and Knee Arthroscopy and the American Physical Therapy Association, were sent a survey via email. Blinded responses were analysed for trends with frequency counts. A summed importance percentage (SIP) was calculated and 80% SIP operationally indicated consensus.

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Related Articles Practical responses to confidentiality dilemmas in elite sport medicine. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Malcolm D, Scott A Abstract AIM: To examine the ethical challenges of upholding patient confidentiality in sports medicine and the practical responses of clinicians to these challenges. METHOD: Questionnaire survey and follow-up semi-structured interviews with the members of the British Olympic Association's Medical Committee and Physiotherapy Forum. RESULTS: Clinicians identified three contextual factors that influenced issues related to patient confidentiality in sports medicine: the use of confidentiality waivers; the facilities available for treatment; and the cultural norms of elite sport. They further identified interpersonal strategies used to lessen or eradicate conflicts, including emphasising the benefits and avoidance of disbenefits for athletes and the potential negative consequences for others. CONCLUSIONS: Aspects of clinicians' practice environment should be designed to enable compliance with the highest levels of ethical conduct. Professional associations should establish guidelines for clinicians' interpersonal conduct in dealing with confidentiality issues and consider their provision of ethics-based continuous professional development. They should also petition for the establishment of athletes' codes of conduct which identify a context-relevant understanding of 'serious harm' and how that might impact on information disclosure. PMID: 23881893 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881893?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles Increased risk of injury following red and yellow cards, injuries and goals in FIFA World Cups. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Ryynänen J, Dvorak J, Peterson L, Kautiainen H, Karlsson J, Junge A, Börjesson M Abstract OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between potentially game-disrupting incidents (PGDIs; red and yellow cards, goals and injuries) and the injury incidence in football. DESIGN: Prospective injury surveillance during three FIFA World Cups in 2002, 2006 and 2010. Official match statistics were obtained for all the matches played in the three tournaments. SETTING: 2002, 2006 and 2010 FIFA World Cups. PARTICIPANTS: Team physicians at the 2002, 2006 and 2010 FIFA World Cups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Injury incidences and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). RESULTS: The injury incidence was significantly higher during match periods within the minute of, or during a five-minute period following a yellow card, red card, another injury or a goal (PGDIs) than during other match periods (76.7/1000 match hours; 95% CI (66.6 to 87.9) vs 54.0/1000 match hours (46.9 to 61.9), p<0.001). There were significant differences in injury incidence between different match periods, with the highest injury incidence seen in the last 15 min of the first half (p<0.001). The PGDIs (other than injury) had a tendency to increase towards the end of the game and the most frequent PGDI was a yellow card. There was a risk ratio of 1.17 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.26) for injury, per PGDI (other injuries excluded) (p<0.001), and 1.15 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.24) after adjusted match time (p<0.001).

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Related Articles PEDro systematic review update: the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises in subacromical impingement syndrome. Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Michaleff ZA, Kamper SJ PMID: 23881891 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]Read more... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881891?dopt=Abstract

Related Articles Does High Knee Flexion Cause Separation of Meniscal Repairs? Am J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Lin DL, Ruh SS, Jones HL, Karim A, Noble PC, McCulloch PC Abstract

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Related Articles Accelerated Weightbearing Rehabilitation After Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Tibiofemoral Joint: Early Clinical and Radiological Outcomes. Am J Sports Med. 2013 Jul 23; Authors: Edwards PK, Ackland TR, Ebert JR Abstract

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