Summa Health System/NEOUCOM

Summa Health System/NEOUCOM

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Contact Information

City
Akron
State/Province
Ohio

Program Information

Residents per class
3
Summa Health System/NEOUCOM Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
8.3
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0  (3)
Didactics/Teaching 
 
8.0  (3)
Operating Experience 
 
9.3  (3)
Clinical Experience 
 
8.7  (3)
Research 
 
5.7  (3)
Residents 
 
9.7  (3)
Lifestyle 
 
8.0  (3)
Location 
 
6.7  (3)
Overall Experience 
 
9.3  (3)
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Overall rating 
 
7.7
Staff Surgeons 
 
8.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
7.0
Operating Experience 
 
9.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
5.0
Residents 
 
9.0
Lifestyle 
 
7.0
Location 
 
6.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Updated Review

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
I wrote my last review late in my intern year - I want to update it now as a PGY-4 since I have more experience and have seen both the good and bad my program has to offer. As social media platforms become an increasingly acceptable way for people to gather information about programs, I think it only fitting that information about Summa stay up to date.

We have experience no significant staff/faculty turnover or major changes since my last review. Dr. Weiner, a graduate of the program and our orthopaedic oncologist, continues to chair the program. Under his leadership, my chief class next year will see our program fully expanded to 20 residents (prior to my class we took 3 a year, we now take 4). At a time when many programs are shrinking or staying the same size, our program continues (even with 4 a year) to be unable to cover all cases.

Since my last post, we have added three new sports medicine attendings. All three are graduates of our program and all are young, energetic, already busy, and eager to teach. Their practices are all slightly different. One, has specialized almost exclusively in hip arthroscopy and is performing some of the most innovative procedures I've seen (scopic femoroplasties, acetabuloplasties, labral repairs, iliopsoas lengthenings, and glut med repairs). He's so busy that a typical week comprises 8-10 hip scope cases.

We've also added a new pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, again a former graduate of our program. We've also added a new hand attending, bringing the total of hand attendings we cover up to 7. One will likely retire this year.

Unfortunately, we will likely be loosing one of our most respected shoulder/elbow attendings, Rob Bell soon. After serving as president of the shoudler/elbow society last year, he is retiring. I expect that in the next 5-10 years we will loose around 5-10 of our 30+ faculty members to retirement. Most, however, have already slowed down enough that we as residents do not routinely cover them, and there are always residents eager to come back to Akron to practice. In fact, all three residents in this year's chief class are at least considering coming back.

Dr. Junko continues as program director and does an excellent job keeping the program running smoothly. He is always receptive to input from residents. Case in point, we decided at the end of last year that we needed to overhaul our interview process. He agreed and allowed us to radically change the way we interview. I think it has been a huge improvement. He walks us through a close review of each rotation at the end of each year to discuss needed improvements/changes. In the past this has included changes as major as cutting time from one rotation or adding to another. He's an excellent advocate for our program.
Didactics / Teaching
Little has changed since my last review with the exception of the new attendings being added to the lecture schedule.

We continue to have a 7am-8am morning conference daily with an 1.5hr grand rounds led by the chief resident each Friday. The morning conference is based on a 2 year rotation lecture schedule which is mostly attending-led. In the summer months, we dissect fresh frozen cadaver specimens. As fall approaches, we shift to focusing the conferences more on OITE preparation - even these conferences are well-attended by our attendings who lend their knowledge to the discussion.

The Austen Bioinovations lab (ABIA) is one HUGE addition that deserves special mention. It is a cooperative between University of Akron, Akron General, and Summa that promotes healthcare related research and education. They own a building downtown (about 3 minutes from our campus). They have a lecture hall with state-of-the-art AV equipment on the first floor. In the basement, they have set up stations that are basically miniature OR suites complete with overhead surgical lights, an OR table, and a complete set of instruments. Each station has an overhead camera for demonstrations. This is where we perform our anatomy dissections in the summer. I can't emphasize enough how this has revolutionized the learning experience. We are able to use fresh frozen cadavers allowing a much more realistic feel for dissection as the tissue planes are preserved. Typically, three residents are assigned a part of the body for dissection each week. The intern will review osteology, muscle origin/insertion/invervation patterns. The junior resident performs the dissection. The senior resident performs and discusses surgical approaches. It's been an excellent experience for everyone. These sessions are also well-attended by attendings.

The ABIA has also allowed us to host workshops and seminars that typically would only be seen at industry-sponsored courses. We've held direct anterior hip workshops, trauma workshops, upper extremity workshops, etc. Usually, Akron General and Summa residents attend. These typically last all day and attendings present didactic portions in the lecture hall with cadaver-based dissections in between. This has revolutionized our education process as it has allowed our junior residents to perform senior-level surgical techniques under the watchful eye of attendings (ilioinguinal approaches to the acetabulum, arthroscopic surgical skills, etc).

Summa is very generous regarding conferences. Interns go to AO basic, PGY-2s go to the OTA course, PGY-3s go to the AAOS arthroscopy course in Chicago, PGY-4s get to pick the conference they want to attend, and PGY-5s go to both the annual AAOS academy meeting and Miller's review course in Denver. You can also attend any conference where you're presenting research. All expenses are paid. You are allowed $50/day for food.
Operating Experience
Operative experience continues to be excellent. As in most programs, however, it is what you make of it. We cover so many attendings that if you choose to do a minimal amount of work, no one will notice. On the other hand, there are never a lack of cases.

Our priority is to make sure all cases at St. Thomas hospital and Akron City hospital have resident coverage. After that, residents are free to cover cases at the outpatient surgery center. The surgery center is an excellent experience - it is extremely efficient and as many cases are done there as at St. Thomas. It's a completely different experience that is great to be a part of.

Spine and total joint cases are so plentiful that we cannot cover them all. We don't even come close to covering all of the cases at the surgery center. As a rule, double scrubbing in our program is rare and usually by choice (a rare case or cool pathology). Even with a junior and senior resident on the same service there is plenty to do. Hand, foot and ankle, sports, shoulder/elbow, oncology, joints, and spine cases are always plentiful and if there are two residents on a service, one may go to office while the other operates and vice versa.

Trauma is the only service where double scrubbing is common. By trauma, I don't mean bread and butter fractures which you will do on every service. I mean complex peri-articular fractures, pelvic/acetabular fractures, complex non-unions with bone grafting, difficult infections, etc. The senior resident typically runs this service and has dibs on cases. The junior resident on service often double scrubs with the expectation that if it is a "bread and butter" type case, the senior walks the junior through the case.

One other thing to note is our experience at Akron Children's. Currently, we spend a month there as interns and then two consecutive months each as a PGY-2, 3, and 5. As chiefs, we run the service. I cannot express how nice it is to not have to leave town for our pediatric experience. Akron Children's is a free-standing children's hospital with 7 full time pediatric ortho attendings and NO fellows. When we rotate there, we are only responsible for covering call at Akron Children's and it is an excellent experience. Even junior residents are given significant autonomy in the OR. Call is busy and it is not unusual in the summer to cast 20-30 kids per call. Some require reductions in the ER and some in the OR. It's an excellent experience. The Cleveland Clinic, Allegheny, Akron General, and Summa all rotate at Akron Children's, but the Summa and Akron General residents take turns as chief.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic - none of us love it, but we all recognize the importance of it. Our clinic experience is probably a little backwards from most programs. We tend to do less clinic as junior residents as the priority is 1. cover call and 2. cover cases. As seniors, we are expected to do one full day of clinic per week on whatever service we're on. This can be two half days and we can mix and match attendings.

Further, starting as a PGY-2, we have our own "house clinic" where we see uninsured or underinsured patients. The unique thing about this clinic is that it is set up like a private office and these patients are "ours". Regardless of what service you're on, you never can tell what might show up - a patient needing a total hip, a fracture that needs surgery, etc. This gives the resident the unique opportunity to work up patients pre-operatively and follow them through surgery. As painful as clinic can be, we would all agree that this is a great experience.
Research Opportunities
There are research opportunities, but research is not a huge focus of our program. Most of us come here because we want to be excellent surgeons, not have high-power research careers.

With that said, the ABIA has opened a lot more doors to research. Furthermore, the university of Akron and the med school, NEOMED have labs and ample graduate students eager to participate in projects with residents. The university of Akron has a world-renown polymer science engineering department and a significant portion of basic science research is based in that discipline.

There is grant money available for research. One grant, the Kepley grant, is competitive and provides $50k for research. So there is money available and opportunities if you want.
Residents
Still one of the best parts of our program. We are careful about who we recruit. The way we look at it is we can teach orthopaedics to most anybody who's willing to learn, but we can't do much to improve your work ethic or help you get along with others. This is a tight-knit group and we are proud of our status in the hospital as hard workers. We never say no to a consult and we work hard to keep up good relations with other programs (gen surg, ER, etc). So someone who is rude and doesn't treat people well is going to stand out in a bad way.

We are a very family friendly program. When I started, our welcome banquet at Dr. Weiner's house looked more like a day care than a group of residents! Each class seems to have one or two who is not married or does not have kids but we are definitely a program that recognizes the unique challenges of being a parents/spouse/resident all at the same time. That doesn't mean we excuse people who don't pull their own weight, but we do help each other.
Lifestyle
I'm from Georgia so moving to Akron was a bit of a shock. However, I have found the people to be welcoming as I would expect of a moderate-sized midwestern city. My nextdoor neighbor began having my wife and I (along with our two kids) over for Thanksgiving the first year we were here and it's become a tradition we look forward to.

I think the way you view Akron will depend on what you're used to. For me, I grew up in rural Georgia and went to college/med school in a city not much larger than Akron, so it hasn't been much of an adustment. Akron has everything I need and as a husband/father I don't have too much time to miss other stuff. However, if you're used to New York, Chicago, etc you may want to spend some time here before deciding to pull the trigger on 5 years!

Finally, the weather in the winter is miserable - it's gray, cold, and wet (snow or rain) from November through April. Summer and Fall are great.

As far as the program, we still have a very traditional call model which might bother some people. We've kicked around the idea of nightfloat since I was an intern and ironically, it ends up being the residents who are most resistent to the change.

Interns take 8-10 calls per month, but these are really 16 hour shifts (in keeping with work hour restrictions). Now that interns spend 6 months on ortho, I think this time is better spent. Interns often operate more than the second years for two reasons. One, we want them exposed to the OR, the attendings, and learning basic surgical technique. Second, they require supervision by at least a PGY-2 so it doesn't make sense to have the PGY-2 and the intern leave a line up to see a consult. It's a pretty nice year. The other services (1mo vascular, 1mo plastics, 1 mo trauma, 1mo ER, 1mo medical ICU) all treat our residents really well.

PGY-2s are primarily responsible for the ER. It's by far the toughest year in terms of call. You do start service-based rotations but it is the understand of both the resident and attending that call comes first and you may have to leave a line-up. As a 2, you'll typically take 8 or 9 in-house calls per month. Call is 24 hours, and you are expected to go home post-call with rare exceptions as noted by ACGME guidlines. Dr. Junko/Weiner are sticklers for the work hour restrictions. There is no under the table activity going on. As chiefs, the expectation is that all residents follow restrictions.We cover two hospitals which are 1.8 miles apart. However, after hours, 99% of the work is at Akron City so there is not a lot of going back and forth. You're always one with a senior resident to run things by. Even as a PGY-2 you get 2 free weekends a month.

As a PGY 3, call frequency drops to about 5 or 6/mo. However, this can be one of the most stressful years as you are now a "senior" resident who must supervise the junior residents. It's a good learning experience as doing a consult and supervising while a junior does one are two different skills. Starting in November, the senior resident is now allowed to go home at 8pm if the work is caught up. This frees you up to operate the next day, but you have to be ready to come back in at a moment's notice to help the junior. You spend more time in the OR this year.

PGY-4 is our most lifestyle friendly year. You take 4 calls per month and only one weekend (usually a Saturday). Pretty much your sole responsibility is to operate. In the fall, you are given a month free of any call or clinical responsibility to do an "away rotation" at the potential fellowship programs of your choice. This is an awesome opportunity not given by many residencies and has helped us land some big fellowships. Also, while rotating on the hand service, the PGY-4 is free of regular in-house call and only takes back-up hand call. It's a great year.

PGY-5 is busier but in a different way. Now, you run the program. You take 1 call per month and are allowed to take built-in moonlighting type call from home. Chiefs have traditionally tacked on a significant amount of money to their base salary which helps for fellowship.
Location / Housing
Very affordable place to live. My wife and I own our home - a 3 bed, 1.5 bath in a very nice West Akron neighborhood. I think most residents own. Most live within a 10-15 min drive. There are apartment complexes and a good mix of new and old homes.
Limitations
I want to try and be honest. I feel like all I've done is talk about how great our program is, and I stand by that. However, there are some things I perceive to be limitations. Just take these with a grain of salt. Recognize that what I view as a limitation or strength you may see differently.

1. We cover two hospitals. When I was a junior resident, both hospitals had ERs that we covered so we were driving back and forth all night. The ER at St. Thomas has closed so that is no longer the case. Junior residents now spend the night at Akron City and pretty much all of their calls after hours are there.

2. We cover a lot of attendings. This is a two edged sword. Its great in the sense that you see many different ways to approach a problem. However, it also makes trying to get ahold of guys to staff consults difficult. It also means it takes longer to learn each attending's preferences which in some cases means they won't let you do as much.

3. Despite the amount of cases there are to cover, this does not always translate to an excellent experience. A lot of it is dependent on the service, the attending (you learn early on who to avoid), your interests, and your skill. I imagine this is somewhat true anywhere.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall, I continue to be VERY happy that I ended up at Summa. We have excellent attendings who all want to see us reach our full potential as surgeons. I come to work every day with a great group of fellow residents. We work hard, but we take care of each other.

Bottom line: if you come here, you'll have the opportunity to become a top notch surgeon. We have every subspecialty in orthopaedics covered right here in Akron by multiple attendings. You'll see various approaches, implants, and techniques. There's research if you want it, but nobody will push it. A lot is expected of us, but in return, we're treated like professionals. No one will hold your hand here - you show up on day one as a doctor, and that's how you're treated. Every few years, we have someone who decides to go into practice without a fellowships and they all seem well prepared. I think that says it all.

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
2010
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(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
9.1
Staff Surgeons 
 
10.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
10.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
6.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
10.0
Location 
 
8.0
Overall Experience 
 
10.0

Akron Summa

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
As stated in previous review:
Dr. Weiner-Chairman, Oncology
Dr. Junko-Program director, Foot and Ankle
Staff-Most did their residency in the area, fellowships around the country and returned to practice.

Summary: Every attending takes pride in the program, and makes an effort to teach. We work hard while on call for them and a mutual respect is apparent. They'll be sure to be on you when you mess up (because we all do at some point), but will also joke around and talk sports or whatever interests you.
Didactics / Teaching
One hour lecture every morning before cases. Schedule is made monthly by the chiefs/PD. Grand rounds as a department every Friday. Trauma/spine trauma/tumor conference monthly. Appropriate pimping and a good learning environment.
Operating Experience
Second to none. As my intern year progressed, I went from the standard "cut here" and "you good with closing?" to doing basic approaches/fractures essentially by myself with close supervision. You read for the case, you do the case. Of course there is some inter-attending variability, but this type of experience in the OR as an intern/junior is essential in my opinion. It forces you to critically think about what you're doing and why.

Observing the senior resident experience, our operative volume is both large and diverse. You'll be holding a scope your first year and expected to be proficient by your 3rd/4th. The same philosophy can be extended to the other subspecialties.

The senior residents told me when I started that our program is designed to have you comfortable with most cases by the end of your 4th year. This might seem like a bold statement, but I can now say I agree.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic. We follow the same patients over the course of our residency with regard to conservative treatment and/or pre/post op.
Research Opportunities
Somewhat limited when it comes to projects that need a lot of funding. Akron is a town with strong engineering/biomaterial research, so there are some opportunities in that arena. The new ABIA downtown (Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron) has brought forward new projects. They also have a good lecture hall/cadaver lab that has hosted local and industry sponsored courses/events.

Some residents have 10+ pubs, others less. Standard distribution in comparison to other programs that i've seen.
Residents
Good mix of guys/gals. We all look out for each other and the culture is definitely one where upper to lower level teaching is efficient and not demeaning.
Lifestyle
We round at 6 every morning, get breakfast as a team, lecture, then cases. This schedule is pretty solid in my opinion. When done with cases/clinic for the day, everyone checks in with the call team to knock out quick ED consults so they don't start off the night backed up. There's a gym by the call room that most of us use before going home.

Call is tough as a 2, but this is pretty universal now given the work hour restrictions.

Plenty of events throughout the year: golfing at Firestone CC, cookout at the chairman's house, Cleveland/Akron sporting events, holiday parties, etc.
Location / Housing
A lot of us are from Ohio, so Akron is what we know and not viewed as a negative. We also have a good amount of folks who have no ties to Ohio, and have found they like it more than expected. It's all what you make it. As with any ortho residency, you'll be busy enough where it won't matter a whole lot with exception of the opinion of your spouse/family. I can say my wife has befriended other resident significant others and Akron already feels like home after year 1.
Limitations
Research would probably be on this list if you're looking for projects that could be costly, although Akron Children's certainly has a good structure for funding/grants.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
I didn't rotate at Summa, but I feel pretty fortunate to have matched here. I would highly recommend any 4th year to spend some time with us who is looking for a community type program as detailed above and other threads/reviews on orthogate.

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
N/A
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
8.0
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
7.0
Operating Experience 
 
9.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
6.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
7.0
Location 
 
6.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Summa Orthopaedics: an intern's perspective

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Dr. Weiner is the department chair - he is a Summa grad and is orthopaedic oncology trained (which is unique of itself as many programs do not have a dedicated tumor surgeon). We get an excellent (but not over-kill) two months of tumor as 3s which helps us do well on that part of our in-training.

Dr. Junko is the PD - he is also a Summa grad and is F&A trained. Both guys love the program and they are huge resident advocates. They make sure we take care of our patients and that we take care of each other. Both are sticklers for the rules - there's no fudging on work hours. But, with the amount of call we take and the number of cases we do there's no need. These two guys are extremely approachable and down to earth. They ask for our imput on rotations, the match list...almost everything. Plus, they're big on turning over responsibility in the OR early on - you'll do the case if you're prepared, and you'll also often dictate the op note. They're big on letting residents struggle through critical intra-op decision making; not just banging a hammer or turning a screw. They are not reckless, however, and they supervise appropriately.

Dr. Weiner holds a welcome party for the interns in late June each year at his house. Some of the other attendings also hold parties at their homes. This promotes closeness among residents and attendings which often translates to increased trust in the OR.

Finally, the staff we work with is top notch. We operate at two hospitals - St. Thomas and Akron City. Most cases are done at St. Thomas which is partially owned by Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center (a large private group in town). The ORs are completely dedicated to CCOC cases and the scrub techs and circulator nurses are fantastic at their jobs. When patients are admitted post-operatively, they get nurses who are used to working ONLY with ortho patients which means they don't call the residents for simple things that other nurses would not know.

All this adds up to a great experience with a very high case volume and facult/staff who genuinely care about patients and resident education.
Didactics / Teaching
Conference is from 7-8 each morning with a longer grand rounds every Friday. M&M takes the place of grand rounds one Friday per month. Residents present their surgical indications on their house patients (i.e. their personal clinic patients) at the start of grand rounds each week which allows for good discussion amongst faculty and fellow residents.

An informal "fracture conference" is held among residents in the physician's lounge at breakfast each morning where the on-call residents show their fractures from the night before and senior to junior resident teaching takes place.

The chiefs put together the daily didactic conference schedule a month in advance and it's usually very educational. More often than not, conference is presented by an attending physician and is occasionally multi-disciplinary (tumor conference includes pathology, heme/onc, and radiology). The radiologists and orthotics/prosthetics guys also play a big role in the conference schedule. Again, much of it is driven by what resident's feel we need.
Operating Experience
Second to none. Our program is a jewel for people who want to start operating on day 1 of intern year and not stop until graduation. The fact that we work with so many attendings from EVERY ortho sub-specialty is huge. We do a tremendous number of total joints and spines (we have 4-5 dedicated total joints surgeons and almost all the surgeons do primary knees and hips). We have 4 spine surgeons, six hand surgeons, one tumor surgeon, four F&A surgeons, three shoulder/elbow surgeons, three sports surgeons, and one dedicated traumatologist. With a huge pediatric hospital in Akron, we rotate with 5-6 pediatric orthopods who are equally terrific.

This is the first year that interns have had to log cases and just to give an idea of our experience: I scrubbed 160 ortho cases (in three months of ortho) - 30 cases were pediatric and 130 were adult. I'm not including ER procedures - these are operative procedures where I was scrubbed with the attending and no other residents were present.

Part of the reason this is possible is our unique intern year. The RRC stipulates that an ortho intern year can only contain three months of ortho. However, in addition to those three months, we take ortho call even on other services for a total of 8 months of ortho call as interns. This is nice because it means we don't waste our time dealing with general surgery consults and instead focus on orthopaedic consults even when we're doing general surgey months. We enter our second year ready to knock out any consult and be competent on many basic ortho cases (endos, nails, basic fractures, etc).

Our chiefs are extremely well prepared for fellowship or private practice. Most of them enter fellowship to hone a skill - not learn a new one.

Our operative experience is extremely well-balanced. I rotated at places where they could knock out complex traumas virtually unsupervised as 3s but had never held a scope. I wanted a program with balance. What sold me on Summa was visiting as a student and watching a chief scope a knee as quickly and accurately as the attending.

We are a rare program that offers "choice" months as upper levels. This essentially allows upper levels to cherry pick the cases they want. So, if they intend to do a sports fellowship, they can spend extra months doing only shoulders, knees, etc. In addition, time is built in as 4s to actually rotate at programs where we might be considering a fellowship.

Bottom line - when you finish at Summa you'll have the cases numbers to be an excellent general orthopod, OR to be well-prepared for fellowship. For people who want to work hard and operate a lot, it doesn't get any better than Summa.
Clinic Experience
This was another huge selling point for me on Summa. We do some traditional service-based clinic with our attendings but not as much as other programs. As we all know, the educational benefit of doing clinic that way varies by attending and service. What's really special about Summa is that starting as a 2, we have a half day a week of house clinic where we see our own house patients. We follow them for any orthopaedic condition from first visit, to surgery, to post-operative care. It's a great way to start seeing what an orthopaedic practice will be like and to assume an "attending" role with your own patients.
Research Opportunities
Research opportunities are there if you want them but the resources seem to wax and wane with hospital funding. We do have the ability to do basic science research at NEOMED (our affiliated med school) or Akron University. As you can imagine, there are ample students and faculty willing to help and some of our residents have done some amazing research. Many residents choose to do their research at Akron Children's hospital since more of the faculty are involved in clinical projects there. While research is a requirement and is encouraged, it is not pushed so it doesn't take away from operative experiences. There is a month of dedicated research in the 2nd year and the 3rd year. However, residents still take call during these months which means they often scrub add-on cases.
Residents
Hands-down the best thing about our program. Our residents all work hard, take care of our patients, and take care of each other. We all get along and we all enjoy getting together outside of work for all sorts of activities. Most of us are married with kids (though a few hold-outs exist) and we help each other take care of our families. I moved my wife and 1 year old daughter to Akron from out of state and it has never been an issue. The other wives took my wife in and they do something together almost every day of the week. I can't say enough good things about how well our residents work together. The trade-off is we never dump on each other. If a consult comes in at 6:59am, the person on call sees it before going home. I like this kind of cooperative spirit and it was one of the greatest assets to me about the program.
Lifestyle
Call is pretty tough at Summa, but it is intentially tough because it's meant to be part of our education. 2s and 3s CURRENTLY take in-house call about 8 times per month. 4s take in-house call about 4 times per month. 5s take in-house call about once a month. However, with the work hour restrictions knocking out post-call OR time, our program is in a transition to a senior home call system. The concern of going to this system has been that a lot of the upper level to lower level teaching we have always valued by having a junior and senior in house will be lost. However, such as system will ensure 3rd-5th years get to operate as much as possible without being "post-call". Currently, we plan to have the upper level resident stay in-house until about 10pm to help knock out consults. They would then go home and only come in if they were needed. Given the quality of our residents, I have no doubts that they would come in if asked.
Location / Housing
I'm not going to lie and pretend that Akron is the greatest city I've ever been to. But remember - you're starting residency - why would you want to be in a place that would make you wish you WEREN'T in the hospital? Akron has everything you could need and Cleveland is only 30 minutes away. There are some great outdoor activities including skiing nearbye. The Akron-Canton airport is a fantastic advantage with cheap flights on delta and airtran to multiple destinations. Cost of living is low but be prepared for hefty property taxes if you buy a home.

My wife and I are from the South and we've been very happy here. People are friendly and laid back. Fortunately, our first Ohio winter was mild, but I understand they can be pretty brutal. Summer and Fall here are terrific and I don't view living in Akron as a down-side at all.
Limitations
Not a great research infrastructure if that's your thing. You can certainly do it, but as I mentioned it may require tieing in with NEOMED or Akron U. Residents have no problem completing their research requirements, but it can be frustrating. The only other limitation is also one of the benefits of our program. We cover two hospitals when we're on call. Fortunately, they're only about a five minute drive but at 2am that can be a frustrating drive! Our call rooms are at St. Thomas which is the main hospital where we operate and where most of our patients are. However, all traumas go to City, a Level 1 Trauma Center and we often are called there for traumas, ER consults and floor consults.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
I couldn't be happier to be at Summa. I rotated at some great programs that are well known but none of them have what Summa has. The number of cases we do, the number of attendings in every specialty we work with, and the culture of helping each other out make this one of the greatest programs I came across on the interview trail. In the end, residency is what you put into it - just showing up won't make you a good surgeon. But, you'll never lack for opportunities at Summa.

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
I did not rotate
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8.3 (3)
Category: Ohio
Summa Health System/NEOUCOM Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program
Updated Review (Written by Adam Land, March 16, 2015)
 
7.7
Akron Summa (Written by Brad Inkrott, March 20, 2013)
 
9.1
Summa Orthopaedics: an intern's perspective (Written by Adam Land, April 18, 2012)
 
8.0

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