New York University School of Medicine/Hospital for Joint Diseases

Hot
Updated
 
0.0
 
9.1 (6)
36939 0

Contact Information

City
New York
State/Province
New York

Program Information

Residents per class
3
New York University School of Medicine/Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

6 reviews
 
83%
 
17%
5-7 stars
 
0%
3-5 stars
 
0%
1-3 stars
 
0%
Overall rating
 
9.1
Staff Surgeons
 
9.0(6)
Didactics/Teaching
 
9.7(6)
Operating Experience
 
8.8(6)
Clinical Experience
 
8.8(6)
Research
 
9.8(6)
Residents
 
8.8(6)
Lifestyle
 
7.8(6)
Location
 
10.0(6)
Overall Experience
 
9.3(6)
View all user reviews View most helpful
Up-to-date Review
Overall rating
 
9.2
Staff Surgeons
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching
 
10.0
Operating Experience
 
9.0
Clinical Experience
 
8.0
Research
 
10.0
Residents
 
10.0
Lifestyle
 
7.0
Location
 
10.0
Overall Experience
 
10.0

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Over 100 orthopaedic surgery attendings in this huge institution, spread amongst Tisch, Bellevue, and HJD. Many of these attendings are huge names and very well known in the academic world of orthopaedics. The chair, Dr. Zuckerman, seems to be very dedicated to the residents, attending most, if not all, of the weekly didactic sessions (doing one himself every month), and almost becomes like a father-figure for the residents. Dr. Egol (PD), although may initially seem very intimidating to med students, seemed to really goes out of his way to make HJD one of the finest residency programs in the country.
Didactics / Teaching
Weekly didactics that residents are required to attend, lasting about 3 hours. Residents are expected to read up before hand on the topics discussed, and pimping (IMO appropriate for the resident level) occurred, but nothing malignant at all. One of the best didactic sessions I saw on the rotation trail, but not too overbearing either as other programs which have them almost every day. Each 1 hour session followed clicker type Q&As dedicated to the OITEs.
Operating Experience
What really stood out to me for the operating experience was the high volume of this place, especially when it comes to the bread and butter trauma cases. Residents were rarely double scrubbed, and if they were, it was mostly because a junior wanted to check out a case that the senior often walked them through. The attendings were hit-or-miss in terms of how much they would let residents do in the OR, but honestly, this was the case at all the institutions I rotated at. Some cases the resident literally did the entire thing with the attending sitting down and chatting, while others the resident was mostly just involved in the approach and closing, with little in between--it's attending dependent especially in this large institution.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic here. Not the fastest, not the slowest. The staff though was pretty good at getting patients placed into the clinic rooms in time, and the fact that the EMR was Epic made it very easy to put in orders, write notes quickly with dot phrases, etc.
Research Opportunities
This may be the biggest strength of HJD. If you're trying to publish, this is the place to go, tons and tons of research opportunities. Almost felt like residents were getting thrown papers at them by attendings. IRB is also taken care of for you as well as recruiting patients for prospective RTPs, which makes the task a whole lot easier. A few residents I met here at 40+ publications, and HJD also has it's own research journal (the Bulletin) on pubmed, so your work will be published somewhere worst case scenario. The requirements for the program is 1 original research, 1 review, and 1 case report.
Residents
Best group of guys I saw on the trail, but I can see why it's not for everyone. Dr. Egol and the residents stress a very particular set of residents that they want to come to their program, and it's very clear during the rotation and during interview day. Very A-type personality and at the same time very bro-y too (they even have a gym right above the OR where residents lift in between cases, and if you bench 300 you'll have your name placed in the 300-club). Almost seemed like a mix between an ortho military squadron and a fraternity.
Lifestyle
Not the best, but not the worst, either. This is a very work hard play hard program, with the emphasis on work. But let's be real, if you're trying to get into a program like HJD or similar, you're not looking for a cake residency either.
Location / Housing
It's in the Kips' Bay/Gramercy Park area of Manhattan, need I say more? Also, NYU provides subsidized housing for incoming residents (preference for those coming from outside of the NYC area), with 1 BR apartment from $1750 to $2100, significantly cheaper than anything else in that area.
Limitations
The biggest limitation in my opinion is the cost, but hey, it's manhattan, you pay for the city experience.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall, an excellent experience during this rotation.

As a rotating medical student:
1. Typical day is usually around 430-5 AM to 6 PM, rarely later, but of course depending on the service.
2. Your role is to manage the patient list in the morning and write notes and see patients independently in clinic. Absolutely do not mess up those two tasks and see as many patients as possible so that your residents don't have to.
3. You'll have to present one 10-15 min ppt presentation to your team at the end on a topic of your choice (don't do something obscure that no one will care about, but do an interesting bread and butter topic and really do a good job on this--aka do NOT just copy orthobullets). You'll also have to do a short case presentation with Dr. Zuckerman during the end as well where you will be asked questions so know your X-rays!
4. There will be one weekend call you take at Bellevue, which is actually pretty fun and a very different experience than HJD and Tisch
5. There's one sawbones and one splinting session that all sub-I's should go to, it's fun, you'll learn a lot, you'll meet other residents, and it's free pizza
6. Every Sub I will scrub in at least once with either Dr. Zuckerman and Dr. Egol. Don't expect them to be super chatty with the sub I so don't take it personally if they don't talk to you--I'm pretty sure they forgot me right after the case.
7. Most importantly, do NOT be annoying and do not try to outdo your co-sub I(s)

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
September 2014
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful? 7 0
incredible operative experience
(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating
 
9.3
Staff Surgeons
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching
 
10.0
Operating Experience
 
10.0
Clinical Experience
 
10.0
Research
 
9.0
Residents
 
9.0
Lifestyle
 
7.0
Location
 
10.0
Overall Experience
 
10.0

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
The faculty are fun, talented, and very focused on resident education. There is a good mix of older famous orthopods and young up-and-coming new faculty. Many are former NYU/HJD residents who chose to come back. All are focused on the resident experience. Compared to other programs I rotated at, there was less pimping and a generally lighter atmosphere in the OR, clinic, and all around. At HJD there are PAs and NPs who manage the floor so you can actually go to the OR without being bothered about minor patient issues.
Didactics / Teaching
Incredible didactics one morning each week. There is a mix of fracture conference in which residents present cases from the previous night(s) on call, and faculty-led didactics on specific topics. Residents are expected to have read in advance, and some residents said this could be stressful after a night on call. Dr. Zuckerman (chairman) is present every day, and usually leads one of the sessions each week himself. The questions residents were asked seemed reasonable, and tailored to their level of training (R2s were asked to describe films, whereas R5s were asked about treatment and surgical techniques). These were consistently very well taught, and at a much more sophisticated level than I have seen anywhere else. They were also always directed 100% at residents, so the teaching was actually valuable.
Operating Experience
The operating experience here is by far the best I have seen. R2s get into the OR at least 2-3 times per week, R3s+ are in the OR 4+ days/week. Residents are never double-scrubbed, always 1-on-1 with attendings. R5s frequently operate solo, with attending available but not in room. Fellows never get in the way. From what I saw, the residents were by far more technically adept than their peers at other programs.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is actually not that painful here -- residents run the show. Attendings are available as needed, but residents develop their own plans, do all joint injections, etc. On arthroplasty, clinic was 1x/wk only.
Research Opportunities
It seems like research opportunities abound -- from basic science to multi-center RCTs. There is a research requirement to work on 3 projects, but they also have an NYU/HJD journal (listed on pubmed), so your papers will definitely get published somewhere. There are some rumors that it's hard to be first author on a paper here, but many residents have dozens of publications by the time they graduate.
Residents
The residents were genuinely nice people, fun to hang out with outside the hospital too. I stayed in close touch with my residents after my rotation -- they were great med student advocates, and enjoyed teaching med students. They treated each other well, too.
Lifestyle
This is a work hard (!) play hard program. There are weeks when R2s work >120 hrs/wk, although the hours apparently get much better as an R3-R5. On my rotation the hours were relatively reasonable, typically 4:30am-5:30pm.
Location / Housing
It's NYC!!! And among the NYC programs, this is by far the best location to live, party, etc (Gramercy/East Village). Housing is expensive, but the salary is adequate to live reasonably well in NYC.
Limitations
You'll work hard here, but that's the point, right?
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall I loved this program -- and I loved it more each day/week. The people are fun, the operative training is outstanding, residents get top fellowships in every field, and residents seem very well trained. I think this is the most resident-focused program in NYC.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
Oct 2012
AW
Top 500 Reviewer
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful? 0 1
well balanced
(Updated: December 28, 2012)
Overall rating
 
8.1
Staff Surgeons
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching
 
8.0
Operating Experience
 
7.0
Clinical Experience
 
8.0
Research
 
10.0
Residents
 
6.0
Lifestyle
 
7.0
Location
 
10.0
Overall Experience
 
8.0

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Dr. Zuckerman is great, he is a ball buster but when you get his sense of humor you'll find him really funny. That being said he demands that things be done correctly or he'll let you hear about it. Other attendings are hit and miss. Definitely a who's who of orthopedics, but some of them were not that impressive to me in terms of operating skills and/or teaching while some are the most amazing people you will meet.
Didactics / Teaching
Lots of didactics, which to me is not a plus because I don't get much out of them. Residents must prepare for lectures because they will all be asked questions. Weekly team conference as well which the residents prepared for on a separate day. I felt it was excessive and they were being overly anxious about it. You do get asked questions but I found them to be pretty laid back unless its obvious you didn't prepare. If you like a large amount of studying/presenting/lectures this would be a good program.
Operating Experience
Above average, but not incredible. Real operative experience begins as a three. One of the residents gave a spreadsheet of his CPT codes in the different areas and he had about 1900, so you can estimate 1100-1200 cases. Actual experience in the OR ranges from just watching to doing the case with minimal interference depending on the attending. Skills in the OR varied with the residents, some being great and some so so.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic. The two's run a iCare center which is like a low level emergency room at HJD so lots of experience there dealing with acute non-operative injuries.
Research Opportunities
Can't be beat, required to do 3 papers (case report, review, and complete research project). Residents have published up to 40 papers. If research is your thing you will find it here, if it is not be prepared to deal with it in heavy doses.
Residents
Varied group. Some were awesome guys I'd love to hang out with, some were socially awkward, anxious (typical med student), and everything in between. Its a large class of 12 so this is to be expected and they don't recruit to a certain personality as small community places will. Not especially close knit, but with 60 residents you wouldn't expect it to be.
Lifestyle
New York City, in Manhattan. If this is where you want to be you can't beat it. Typical residency, prepare to work hard. 5am to 10pm days are not unusual (although also not the norm)
Location / Housing
Subsidized housing available with priority to new residents just moving to the area. It's very nice and a great deal for the money and location. Other than that, Manhattan apt hunting rules apply meaning very expensive and very little space for the money.
Limitations
None.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall you can't talk bad about this program, it is extremely well balanced. The names are some of the biggest in orthopedics, good lectures, above average operating time, top notch research with the big names, and located in Manhattan. This is a large program with equal emphasis on operative experience, research, and academics. It comes down to whether it fits you though.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
Fall 09
CM
Top 500 Reviewer
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful? 1 0
NYU HJD
(Updated: December 10, 2011)
Overall rating
 
9.1
Staff Surgeons
 
8.0
Didactics/Teaching
 
10.0
Operating Experience
 
9.0
Clinical Experience
 
9.0
Research
 
10.0
Residents
 
9.0
Lifestyle
 
8.0
Location
 
10.0
Overall Experience
 
9.0

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Big names. Big personalities to go with them. Everyone knows Dr. Zuckerman and he's a great resident advocate. The PD Dr. Egol is a bit brusque but also a resident advocate.
Didactics / Teaching
Excellent. Lots of conferences - indications, fracture, etc. Zuckerman does a biweekly conference that is basically a pimp session. I will say that although I wouldn't call these conferences malignant, I found the atmosphere...unpleasant. Still, fear can be a great motivator and the residents knew their stuff.
Operating Experience
Excellent, albeit only for the PGY-3/4/5. The PGY-2s at HJD were either in clinic, on the floor or in iCare, HJD's version of an urgent care center. My PGY-2 got into the OR once the entire month, and it was to help remove an ex-fix. I think one of the big perks at NYU, however, is that once you are a PGY-3, you spend most of your time in the OR and you work with many different surgeons so that you get an exposure to different ways of approaching an operation - such as doing a THA through an anterior approach. Like in all programs, some of the attendings don't like to give up the knife but others basically sat back and let the resident do the entire case.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic.
Research Opportunities
Excellent. Dr. Egol is constantly pressing the residents to pump out some publications.
Residents
Huge program. Lots of residents. I liked most of them, didn't like some of them but when you have 62 that's bound to happen.
Lifestyle
Average. In terms of hours and workload, not too bad. However, the intense atmosphere of the place wore on me and I was only there for a month. Most of the residents seemed OK with it, so maybe it's a self-selecting group that ends up there.
Location / Housing
In my opinion, the best location of any of the Manhattan programs. You can live in the lower east side, east village, west village, lots of cool places. Seems like it's hard to get subsidized housing unless you're coming from far away. If you're from the tri-state area, forget about it. Obviously your rent is going to suck.
Limitations
The only problem I personally saw with the program (and what kept it from being in my top 3 programs) is the lack of in-depth experience on trauma at Tampa General Hospital. This is a top trauma fellowship, but the USF residents are kind of lost in the crowd as residents from several other programs are rotating at TGH also. I think if USF were to expand their experience at TGH and take more call, it would GREATLY improve the residency, in my opinion.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Great program overall with big names, big research, and a good breadth of training opportunities. That said, I didn't feel like I necessarily wanted to be in that atmosphere for 5 years. Others may love it though, so to each his own.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
Fall 2009
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful? 0 0
Rotator Review of NYU HJD Ortho
(Updated: December 10, 2011)
Overall rating
 
10.0
Staff Surgeons
 
10.0
Didactics/Teaching
 
10.0
Operating Experience
 
10.0
Clinical Experience
 
10.0
Research
 
10.0
Residents
 
10.0
Lifestyle
 
10.0
Location
 
10.0
Overall Experience
 
10.0

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Chairman: Dr. Zuckerman is the current AAOS president, and even though he probably has a ton of responsibilities he is still very much involved in all aspects of the programs. I was on his service when I rotated and while he has a very commanding presence, I didn't find him to be intimidating like the other reviewer. Rather he was very friendly and funny; highly involved with resident education; and even rounded on his patients twice a day.<br />
PD: Dr. Egol is a very intense program director, but it is clear that the resident education and the well-being of the residents are his #1 priority. I worked with him two days in the OR and the residents were very hands-on and did the vast majority of the case while he led them through the case. The residents call him a "research machine" since he's got like 150 publications. He also makes sure the residents are well read in regards to the ortho literature.<br />
Faculty: I agree with the other reviewer that this is definitely a powerhouse program and one of it's key strengths is that you work closely with a "who's who" of orthopaedic surgeons. There are over 100+ attendings, so if you want a program where you're on a first name basis with all the attendings, this may not be for you. But the way I see it, the advantage is that you get great hands-on experience learning many different techniques and approaches from some of the top orthopaedic surgeons in the country.
Didactics / Teaching
They have three hours of didactic teaching every Wednesday morning at 6:30am and a variety of service dependent conferences throughout the week. The residents get pimped during the weekly fracture conference, but the rest of the didactics are generally lectures. I didn't think the pimping was malignant at all, and the residents know the literature better than any other residents at other programs that I rotated.
Operating Experience
I was at HJD during my rotation and I thought that the residents were very hands-on. This is not a program where the attendings disappear and the residents do cases completely on their own. The attendings are always present, but they let the residents have a lot of autonomy, and from what I've heard they have even more autonomy at Bellevue and Jamaica Hospital. They clearly have a system that works as their chiefs were the most competent residents that I saw during my rotations. Also, this is not a fellow heavy program where the residents are always competing with the fellows for the best cases.
Clinic Experience
The residents are in clinic 1-2 days a week depending on the service and the majority of the services have a resident-run clinic once a week. The residents do everything on their own, but there is always an attending around to run questions by if they need it. I got to see a lot of patients on my own and then presented to the chief resident who would help me come up with a treatment plan. The residents were very helpful and tried to teach the sub-i's whenever they could. They also have an indications conference once a week where they present the previous week's clinic patients where they have to defend their surgical indications in front of a panel of experts in their field so that by the time they finish residency they know how to properly indicate patients for surgery.
Research Opportunities
Research is strongly emphasized because the program director is really into research. From what I heard, the residents are required to have three publications before they graduate (usually a case report, review article and clinical study) as well as submit a research grant proposal. Some residents thought that this was a little much, but in the end it's probably good for your career.
Residents
Hands down, the residents here were the most competent and knowledgeable over any other place I rotated. The program is tied for the largest in the country with 12 residents a year. I'm a fan of larger programs so this was a plus for me, and they take two residents for a research year between their 2nd and 3rd year. Almost all of residents I met were very cool, down to earth and friendly. It seemed like they hang out together when they get off of work. There were a couple of people that I didn't get along with personally, but you're not going to get along with everyone everywhere, and with 62 residents there are plenty of awesome people around.
Lifestyle
This is definitely a work hard, play hard kind of place. Work hours seem to vary based on the service, but in general the residents work close to 80 hours per week, which is pretty standard for most programs. A lot is expected from the residents, but I never got impression that they were over worked or thought that the program was malignant. In your free time you are living in the heart of NYC which is pretty awesome.
Location / Housing
The majority of residents live in apartments around the city (I've heard of a few who commute from Brooklyn). Some of the residents have subsidized housing and from what I heard from a friend of mine in med school at NYU, they are getting more options for subsidized housing. Housing isn't cheap, but that's NYC for you. As far as neighborhoods go, it's in a really nice one with good restaurants and bars close by--and if you don't like those there are millions of places to chose in Manhattan.
Limitations
I couldn't find that many weaknesses of the program. The only drawback for me is the cost of living, but in talking to the residents they are all able to manage.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
I thought that NYU was an amazing place. I thought the residents were awesome, there are great didactics/conferences, residents had a lot of autonomy in the OR, residents get their top choice of fellowship at the best places, the faculty are top-notch, there is a huge focus is on resident education, and fellows never take away from the residents' experience. It's arguably the best residency program in the country in my opinion.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
Fall 2009
CB
Top 500 Reviewer
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful? 0 2
View all user reviews

Orthogate Reviews Widget

 
9.1 (6)
Category: New York
New York University School of Medicine/Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program
Up-to-date Review (Written by MV, May 25, 2015)
 
9.2
incredible operative experience (Written by Amy Wasterlain, February 23, 2013)
 
9.3
well balanced (Written by Christopher Mileto, April 01, 2010)
 
8.1
NYU HJD (Written by VN, March 02, 2010)
 
9.1
Rotator Review of NYU HJD Ortho (Written by Christopher Bechtel, February 20, 2010)
 
10.0

image
Get this widget View all widgets