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Contact Information

City
Worcester
State/Province
Massachusetts

Program Information

Residents per class
5

University of Massachusetts Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

5 reviews

Overall rating 
 
9.1
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0  (5)
Didactics/Teaching 
 
8.6  (5)
Operating Experience 
 
10.0  (5)
Clinical Experience 
 
9.2  (5)
Research 
 
8.8  (5)
Residents 
 
10.0  (5)
Lifestyle 
 
8.8  (5)
Location 
 
8.0  (5)
Overall Experience 
 
9.4  (5)
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(Updated: July 15, 2020)
Overall rating 
 
9.6
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
10.0
Research 
 
9.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
10.0
Location 
 
9.0
Overall Experience 
 
10.0

UMass: Excellent Training in a Team Oriented Culture

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Chair: David Ayers, MD (Joints)
Program Director: Nicola DeAngelis, MD (Sports Medicine) - new as of May 2019
Dr. DeAngelis completed medical school and residency training at UMass and therefore, has experienced many different chapters of the program. He is incredibly approachable and his top priority is positively representing the residents’ voices to the orthopedic faculty and medical school GME team. He meets with the residents every other week prior to the CORE didactic sessions and meets with the Chief residents monthly.
Associate Program Director: (new as of May 2019) Michael Stauff, MD (Spine)
Vice Chair of Education: (new as of May 2019) Marci Jones, MD (Hand)

Over the past few years, the diversity and strength of each sub-specialty representation have continued to grow. We’ve added faculty in the following subspecialties over the past four years:
Sports: Harvard Residency, Boston Childrens/MGH Fellowship
Joints: Brown Residency & Fellowship (trauma), Cleveland Clinic Fellowship (joints)
Shoulder: Yale Residency, Jefferson Fellowship
Shoulder: Brown Residency & Fellowship (trauma), Mount Sinai (shoulder)
Joints: UMass Medical School & Residency, New England Baptist Fellowship
Trauma: Columbia Residency & Fellowship, Carolinas Medical Center Fellowship

Overall, our attendings are very accessible and approachable, encouraging us to call or text with any questions or concerns. Most also encourage us to call them by their first names - a reflection of a culture in which we are respected and seen as colleagues.
Didactics / Teaching
Our primary didactic educational experience (CORE) occurs very Friday morning for 3-3.5 hours. These hours are protected time and, other than the on call resident, all residents are excused from clinical duties to attend these conferences. The session usually starts with 30 minutes of our PD checking in with the residents and updating the group on items specific to the residency. During the first three months of the year (July-September), the senior residents host “Ortho 101” for the junior residents. They cover the most commonly seen “on call” consults and management to prepare the youngest residents to succeed on call. During the regular CORE schedule, the lectures range from topic-specific lectures led by faculty to OITE/Orthobullets question review sessions on a two year curriculum. Journal club occurs monthly and is usually hosted at an attending’s home where we share food and discuss the papers in a more casual environment. Outside of CORE, the educational sessions are campus and rotation dependent. At the Level 1 trauma center (University campus), morning fracture rounds occur daily and involve the junior residents presenting the previous day’s consults. This session is attended by 1-4 of the trauma attendings who provide feedback and point out key management points. This campus also holds trauma indications conference weekly and pediatric case presentations weekly. At the Memorial campus, we have a robust indications conference in spine, total joints, and shoulder arthroplasty that is attended by residents on service and by the attendings. We also have monthly “Morbidity and Mortality” conferences and “Grand Rounds,” both which are widely attended by our faculty and medical students. Our Anatomy Course also occurs monthly and includes a morning didactic session led by a PGY4/5 who takes the residents through the anatomy, imaging, approaches and common pitfalls during surgery. The residents and faculty then spend 1-2 hours in the cadaver lab reviewing gross anatomy led by a dissection team who performed that month’s dissection. Also, we have a yearly simulation curriculum for the PGY1 and PGY2 residents that allows for practice in suturing techniques, drilling/sawing techniques, use of the bur, and arthroscopy techniques.
Operating Experience
The volume of and early introduction to operative experience are definitely highlights of this program. Another strength is the small number of fellows in our program - two hand and two sports fellows. Due to the high volume of cases and low number of fellows, residents are rarely pushed out of cases by senior fellows/residents. Senior residents function as fellows on sports and hand. All of our rotations occur at one of the four campuses within a 1.5 mile radius in Worcester. Our rotations are 10 weeks long and include the following:
PGY2: Trauma (two blocks), Hand, Foot and Ankle and Pediatrics
PGY3: Trauma, Pediatrics, Joints, Spine, Sports
PGY4: Trauma (one block), Oncology/Joints, Foot and Ankle, Hand, Sports
PGY5: Trauma (one block), Joints, Shoulder/Elbow, Spine & Pediatrics
As a PGY2/3, you’re on call approximately Q5 at the Level 1 trauma campus and Q4 at the Memorial campus. Call is 24 hours with a post call day. The hand and sports rotations follow a “mentorship model.”
We have multiple attendings in each subspecialty and one orthopedic oncologist. During the PGY-4 Oncology/Joints rotation, the resident spends one day in clinic and two days in the OR, specifically with our orthopedic oncologist.

One of the most exciting additions to our program is the opening of a second ambulatory surgery center in June of 2019. Owned by a private medical group, this center is highly efficient and state of the art. The current goal is to transition to day surgery arthroplasty in this surgery center.
Clinic Experience
For all rotations, each rotation has a balanced OR and clinic time with residents spending 1-2 days per week in clinic. The residents get more clinic time as the PGY2 on pediatrics and PGY4 on the sports and hand services. On these rotations, residents spend 2-3 days in clinic.
Research Opportunities
In the fall of 2010, UMass was awarded a 14 million dollar grant from the NIH to develop a prospective total joint registry. Ten years later, the FORCE-TJR database includes access to patient reported pain and function scores for over 50,000 patients from a national network of more than 230 surgeons practicing in 28 states. Our research output continues to grow with the addition of faculty with interests in global health, quality improvement and health economics.

Over the last three years, numerous abstracts have been accepted and presented at various meetings including AAOS. There is one “research resident” in each incoming intern class who spends a year between their PGY1 and PGY2 years performing research. Our most recent research resident published nine papers, had 15 abstracts accepted and attended three conferences with 24 ongoing projects. All residents are required to complete one project during their five year residency and present this project at the conclusion of their chief year. For those interested in research, the opportunities are available, but for those who prefer to allocate their time into medical education, technology development or other areas, they have ample time to pursue those other areas outside of their clinical duties and training.
Residents
The residents and culture of our program are truly what make it unique and special. We emphasize teamwork, tireless hard work and camaraderie. Interns and chief residents arrive at the same time to round on patients and write progress notes. After running the list in the morning, all residents who are not immediately heading to the ORs help tackle the “to do list.” When the on call junior resident is busy with several pending consults, the senior residents never hesitate to help out and see consults to decrease the junior’s burden.

Approximately ? of our residents are married and ? have children. Most live within a 20 minute drive of Worcester. Several have spouses who work in Boston or Rhode Island and are able to live in between locations with their significant other while still allowing for reasonable commutes. We hang out after work often grabbing drinks, hiking, golfing, even playing hockey together. We look for residents who are hard working and gritty, but also enjoy socializing and incorporating their families into the UMass Ortho family.
Lifestyle
See "Residents" section
Location / Housing
The city of Worcester food, nightlife and cultural scenes have exploded since 2015. The cost of living is much lower than Boston, yet the food options include everything from BYOB Italian to Ethiopian and Afghan restaurants. Worcester is the home of several sports teams including the AAA Red Sox affiliate team The WooSox, a professional arena football team and a number of college sports teams, providing numerous opportunities for game coverage for those interested in sports medicine. There are seven breweries including Tree House and Wormtown within 45 minutes. Boston is accessible via car or an hour direct train.
Limitations
One limitation is that pediatric and oncology caseloads are low as many of these cases are treated in Boston and we do not rotate outside of Worcester. Our shoulder and elbow rotation occurs during PGY5, which may be tough for residents considering this specialty. However, there are definitely opportunities to operate with our shoulder/elbow surgeons earlier in one’s training based on our high case volume and surgeon availability.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall, UMass is an excellent training environment for those interested in working hard, operating frequently and learning from well-trained attendings. Our chiefs match into excellent fellowships as well. The matches from the last two years are listed below:

2021
Joints - Cleveland Clinic
Sports - Tahoe Ortho Institute
Hand - UT Southwestern
Joints - UC Davis
Joints - Lenox Hill

2020
Hand - Lahey Clinic
Shoulder/Elbow - Johns Hopkins
Joints - Hospital for Special Surgery
Joints - New England Baptist
Joints - UT Houston

2019
Spine – Texas Back Institute
Joints – The Core Institute
Hand – University of Chicago
Sports – New England Baptist
Joints – Hospital for Special Surgery

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
2020
Sunset over the University Campus
Team UMass
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: November 30, 2013)
Overall rating 
 
9.7
Staff Surgeons 
 
10.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
10.0
Research 
 
10.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
9.0
Location 
 
9.0
Overall Experience 
 
10.0

UMass

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Faculty continues to grow along specialty lines. All subspecialties are covered and covered well. Faculty is resident friendly and create an excellent learning environment.
Didactics / Teaching
Little change from previous post 3 years ago. CORE lecture series every friday; faculty led. daily fracture conference and weekly subspecialty conference. Residents prepared for OITE and Boards and do incredibly well
Operating Experience
Still one of the strengths of the program. Residents are involved operatively early on. This is important for nearly all applicants and can be evaluated by looking at the posted case log numbers for all programs
Clinic Experience
Outstanding. Excellent level one trauma center; well known traditional strength. Elective surgical experience is now equal to or better than the trauma experience. All specialties are covered. Residents go into all specialties; a sign of the outstanding experience they get here in specialties. All rotations in city; no need to rotate to away sites
Research Opportunities
Now a top 10 orthopedic research program. Well established bone biology group that works at the molecular level. Outstanding regenerative medicine lab that is working on bone and cartilage regeneration. New since last post is the FORCE-TJR national joint replacement registry based at UMASS. Incredible research opportunities for residents and students
Residents
Strength of this program. residents are incredible and true team. Residents like each other and socialize outside the hospital.
Lifestyle
Good lifestyle. Residents work hard but in great supportive and collaborative environment. Outside large city in a medium city. allows for afforable housing and safe environment. Access to larger cities; Boston/Manhattan but none of the hassles
Location / Housing
Afforable and close to the hospitals. Many residents buy their homes and many are passed down from graduating chiefs
Limitations
Very few limitations; some consider Worcester one but I do not. Residents are fantastic; attendings great; this program continues to improve; still unknown to some that are not aware of all the changes that have occurred over the last 5-8 years. See below
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
A must see program if you are considering programs in New England. Strong in all the important places. If you dont know much about UMASS you should look further

Qualification

I am an alumnus of this program.
Date of Rotation
NA
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: January 30, 2013)
Overall rating 
 
9.3
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
10.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
10.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
9.0
Location 
 
8.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

University of Massachusetts

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
The significant update from the previous post is that we now have all of the orthopedic sub-specialties represented with the hiring of several new faculty members. Since 2009, we have added 2 new Foot Ankle fellowship trained attendings (Fellowships: Union Memorial, Michigan), 1 Tumor/Oncology attending (Mayo Clinic), 1 trauma attending (Minnesota/Hennepin County), 2 new spine attending (Vancouver, Mayo Clinic), 2 sports attendings including a guy who does a lot of elbow surgeries (MGH, Kerlan Jobe), and we just added another new pediatric/trauma attending (Duke Pedi Fellowship) this month. Overall there is a big growth in our department in terms of number of staff and research funding (see below). All of the new attendings are very approachable and we are on a first name basis with most of them. The diversity of their fellowship training really adds to the educational experience of our residents in terms of both clinical and operative. We have also expanded our PM and Rehab dept. with addition of several new attendings as well. Most of our faculty member place emphasis on the education of the residents and will go to bat for us on any type of issues.
Didactics / Teaching
Same as below. CORE is still on a Friday morning from 6:30am to 9:30am and taught by attending physicians. We try to do a journal club everyone month and also sawbone workshop once per month as well. Overall our educational conferences are very good and organized. Last year as a group, our overall program OITE score was in the mid/upper 80th percentile in comparison to all of the ortho programs. That is a testament to the CORE curriculum and individual efforts.
Operating Experience
I definitely still agree with the previous post that our operative experience is probably the best aspect of the program. You get to operate as the first assist early on in your training. Although as a PGY2 and 3 you are not in the OR as much as the PGY4 and 5 due to being on call at the big house and post call, but when you are in the OR, you get to do a lot. During the PGY-4 year, we rotate through trauma, joints, sports, and hand. In each of these rotations, you are the one doing the case with the attending assisting. It is very hands on. As the PGY-4 on the trauma service, you are in the OR with the attending pretty much everyday for the 3 month block doing cases. As you progress to the chief year, you will be able to have the opportunity to walk though junior residents through bread and butter cases.
Clinic Experience
Same as below. A lot of your clinical time comes as a PGY 4 when you are on the sports and hand service because those rotations are mentorship model setup and you are in clinic when your attending is in clinic, which is about 2 to 3 days per week. Also when you are on the pedi ortho service, you will be in clinic about 2-3 days per week. That's definitely plenty of clinic for most residents.
Research Opportunities
The other big change in our department since the last post is the amount of research. UMass was just recently awarded with a 14 million dollar grant to start a prospective total joint registry from the NIH. There is several NIH R01 grants in the orthopedic department along with R21s and many other smaller grants. Overall the amount of NIH research dollars in our dept total to somewhere in the $20 to $25 million mark which puts us in the top 3 or 4 ortho programs in the country in terms of NIH funding. There is a tremendous amount of research growth in our department just in the last couple of years. This is evident by the amount of abstracts we had accepted to the last year ORS and AAOS meetings. So the bottom line is that there will be plenty of research opportunities for the incoming residents to take on in the future. All of the orthopedic residents are required to do one project during residency and to present it at graduation. But if you are aggressive and want to take on more projects then the sky is the limit. We have had residents that put out over 20 publications coming out of this program.
Residents
This is definitely one of the strength of our program! We work well with each other and emphasize teamwork. The chief resident round at the same time as the intern every morning to see patients and write progress notes. About half of the residents are married and the other half are single. We do hang out with each other after work especially going out for happy hours or the married couple have their kids play together. The Chief residents are very much involved in the interview and resident selection process. We definitely look for people who are more laid back but at the same time is willing to work hard.
Lifestyle
See the previous post.
Location / Housing
There are more developments happening in Worcester now. More restaurants opened in the last couple of years. You can pretty much find anything here from good food to good beer bars to entertainment (DCU center) and sports. Housing is cheap and both Boston and Providence is about 45 mins away. Location (Worcester) is probably better for couples than single guys/girls.
Limitations
We are still in the process of trying to add another 1-2 residents. This may happen this year, which will make a difference in terms of earlier sports and hand experience. Also there is talk of adding an elective research block to the schedule as well. The other limitation or a plus to some people is that in our program, we do 9 months of spine surgery. 3 months as an intern, then PGY3 and then PGY5. So for people who are going into spine this would be a dream come true, but for the people going into sports, then this is kinda painful. Just all depends on the prospective.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
UMass is definitely a great Orthopedic residency with excellent balance between clinical, operative and research experiences. All the opportunities are there for you to take advantage of in our program. Our residents work hard and work well together. We do well in the fellowship match, this year Chiefs are going to Union Memorial (Foot/Ankle), Hospital for Special Surgery (Sports/Shoulder), Univ. of Pittsburgh (Spine), and an international total joint fellowship (Glasgow, Scotland). We are definitely a blue collar type of program. As a resident who has gone through the program, I definitely have no regrets and would highly recommend UMass to anyone who is interested in a solid and well balanced training program. <br />
<br />
If you are interested, either apply or the best way to check out our program is by rotating though. <br />
<br />
For more information regarding UMass, here is our new website,<br />
<br />
http://www.umassmed.edu/orthopedics/index.aspx <br />
<br />
Updated info to our program coordinator,<br />
<br />
Michelle Auger<br />
Residency and Fellowship Program Coordinator<br />
University of Massachusetts Medical School<br />
Department of Orthopedics<br />
55 Lake Avenue North<br />
Worcester, MA 01655<br />
<br />
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <br />
(774) 442-4262 - Phone<br />
(774) 443-7273 – FAX

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
10-16-2010
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
9.0
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
10.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
9.0
Location 
 
7.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Excellent Overall Training with a Good Mix of Oper

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
We have a very good group of attendings with mixed personalities. They will teach and let you do the cases in the OR. Some are better than others, but that is in every program. We are on a first name basis with about half of the attendings. Everyone is benign in the OR and pimping is done in a non malignant way. Our chairman is very supportive to the residents esp in research. We have periodic meeting with our program director to go over all the issues in the residency and he listens to us. Things have changed because of these meetings. Majority of the attendings are very approachable and easy to work with.
Didactics / Teaching
We have conference every morning from 6:30am to about 7:30am. Our primary conference is on Friday morning from 6:30am to 9:30am and it is organized by the attendings by topics. Also once per month, we have journal club at the end of the month. Weds morning is our Grand Rounds from 7am to 8am. At the University campus, Mondays are trauma conference to review all the films from the weekend, Tuesdays and Thursdays are Pedi/OITE/senior resident organized conferences. At the Memorial campus, Mondays are indications conference for Joints or Spine, Tues are Spine/Pedi/Joint/Foot and ankle related conferences. Overall our didactics are very good and organized by either attendings and/or senior residents.<br />
<br />
http://www.umassmed.edu/orthopedics/residency/curriculum.aspx?linkidentifier=id&itemid=9170
Operating Experience
This is one of the biggest plus of our program. We operate alot and very earily on in our training. When you are rotating as an intern for 3 months at the Memorial campus, you get to do the hip fractures and some basic bread and butter ortho cases. The trauma experience is unbeatable. We have one of the busiest level I trauma center in the country with almost 130,000 visits to the ED each year and Helicopter that cover about 150 mile radius of the medical center. Alot of hot trauma and very busy. The trauma attendings are a great group and you get to do the case starting as a PGY 2 (tibia nail, hip fxs, ORIF, etc). The bigger cases goes to the more senior residents, but I have done ORIF of couple of Acetab fxs when I was a PGY-2 as the first assist. You spend time on the trauma service as a PGY2,3,4 and 5 so coming out of this place, you will definitely feel comfortable doing trauma cases. <br />
<br />
Our operative experience in other areas are also excellent. We recently recruited a new spine attending who will let you do your side of the cases even as a PGY-2. He will let you do all the dissection/pedical screws/rod/decompression (spine can actually be fun when you are involved in the cases). Also the joint experience is excellent here, as a PGY-3, you will do 3 months of Joints covering primarily one attending who is very busy. It is you and him in the room and you do skin to skin on all the total knee/hip replacements. I logged about 50 knees and 50 hips during that 3 months and I feel comfortable right now as a PGY-3 putting in primary joints. You will also do 3 months of joints as a PGY-4 and then as a PGY-5. Another area of improvement in our program is foot/ankle. We recently hired 2 attending who are now up and running. You get to cover them as a PGY-3 at the Memorial campus and there is a good mix of recon (triple/subtalar arthrodesis,flatfoot correction,achille debrid+FHL transfer,etc) with trauma cases. These two attendings will walk you through the cases and no double scrubing. The Pedi service is primarily clinics, but there is still some good cases. We also hired a tumor ortho surgeon that is picking up with tumor cases. You will cover him as a PGY-4. <br />
<br />
The other great thing about our program is the elective rotation on the Hand and Sports services. You will do alot of good cases and never double scrub with the fellow, its always just you and the attending.<br />
<br />
Overall our operative experience is unbeatable! As a PGY-2 and 3, you will miss some operative days due to being on call or post call, but when you are scrubed with the attending, you are doing the cases. Plus when you are a PGY-4 and 5 here, you will be in the OR plenty to make up for any missed OR days.
Clinic Experience
Our clinic experience is minimum. We are required to go to clinic about half day per week and you will be in clinic more when you are on the trauma / Pedi rotations. The option of going to clinic is always there for you but we have so many attendings operating daily that all the residents are in the OR covering cases which makes going to clinic very difficult. One of the solutions to this is that we are applying to add another 1-2 residents to the entering class (4 to 6) which will free people to go to clinics in the future.
Research Opportunities
There is a ton of research opportunities here at Umass. Things have changed alot for us since the last review from Dr. Hibbert above in 2007. Currently, the department of Orthopedics have 83 active projects running. There are 4 full time PhDs working in the ortho research dept. Two of them received R01 NIH grants in 2008 for about $2 million each on outcomes and tissue engineering projects. This is very hard to do, esp to get as an orthopedic research investigator. We have a total of about $5 million dollars funding in dedicated Ortho research and that puts our dept among the top 10% of all programs in terms of NIH fundings. I believe we are currently trying to hire another 1-2 biomechanics PhDs as well. Half of the residents here are 6 year research residents that have spent 1 year of dedicated time in the lab. <br />
<br />
So the bottom line is that there is alot of research activity if you are interested as a resident. Our program require that all residents complete one research project before graduation and you will present your project to the department during the annual research day.<br />
<br />
Example of resident research that have been accepted to recent national meetings:<br />
http://www.umassmed.edu/Content.aspx?id=34204&linkidentifier=id&itemid=34204
Residents
One of the strength of our residency. We get along very well with each other. In the morning, we round as a team, the intern comes in the same time as the chief. Alot of the times, the chiefs and PGY-4s are helping out with the floor work, dictations, and also helping to see consults if the junior is busy in the OR. During the end of the day at the University campus, when you come out of the OR before you go home, you call the on call resident to see if they need any help with consults. We all meet at the end of the day to make sure that the on call resident is caught up with all the consults/work before going home. It is very important that the resident we recruit fits in and that is why all the chiefs in our program are on the admissions committee and they interview/have a significant say in the selection process.<br />
<br />
We do have gatherings over the year and hangout outside of work. The married folks with kids tend to hang out with the each other and the single people tends to go out together. It is a very laid back atmosphere and we work hard when we are in the hospital but also have a life outside.
Lifestyle
Good lifestyle. Intern year is very nice. you do 3 months of Ortho, anes,rad,ED, which are very benign. The only hard months are gen surg and vascular surg. On call as a PGY-2 and 3 at the Big House is very busy during the summer and fall. You will do alot and see alot. Ton of highway trauma. Life is awesome as a PGY-4 as you don't have call for 9 months (just for 2 weeks on hand)with all weekends off. You will take senior call on the 3 months when you do trauma, but only come in if there is a case going. Majority of time, you are home with the juniors in the ED doing all the consults. As a chief, you will be on call for trauma throughout the year Q5 (4 chief and 1 PGY-4). On the weekends, you come in to operate and that is it. Can be busy but half of the time, you are home sleeping taking senior call.<br />
<br />
We also have NP coverage during the day for both campus that will handle all the floor work. You sign in with them in the morning and then they will sign out to the on call person at about 3-4 pm. This is very important at the Memorial campus because the on call person there is usually in the OR with the NP taking care the floor plus some ED consults during the day.
Location / Housing
Worcester is cheap for housing esp. with the recent market. You can buy a nice place with a resident salary. Majority of the residents in our program own. There has been alot of restaurants being built recently. Plenty of places to go out for the single guy/girl with 10 colleges around. Boston and Providence is only 45 mins away. Hospital provides parking for about 30 bucks per month. If you like snowboarding/skiing, Wachusetts is only 20 mins away and a decent mountain. Season pass is only $200. If you are a big city person, Worcester is not a metropolis.
Limitations
1) Sports and Hand rotations happens when you are a PGY-4 resident which would be better if we can do it early. We are trying to change this by adding residents and possibly adding an elective block into the junior resident's schedule. This should happen in the future. <br />
<br />
2) More clinic time. No one likes to go to clinic, but it is an important part of the educational process. As of now, there is so many OR cases that it is very hard to be free to to to clinic (on top of the days that are required). The only time to go is post call, which is not desirable esp if you are up all night. Plus with the ACGME regulations, you cant stay past noon anyways.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Umass Orthopaedic residency is a great overall program with plenty of research and great operative expereencie. I tried to be as objective as possible on this review and hope this will be helpful to the 4th year medical students interested in our program/orthopedics. A rotation will help you out alot here and also give you a first hand experience of our program. <br />
If you have any additional questions, you can contact our program coordinator:<br />
<br />
Michelle Auger<br />
Orthopaedic Residency and Fellowship Coordinator<br />
University of Massachusetts Medical School<br />
55 Lake Avenue North<br />
Worcester, MA 01655<br />
(508) 856-4262<br />
(508) 334-7273 FAX<br />
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<br />
<br />
Every program will have their strength and weakness, you just have to find one that will fit you and your career goals.<br />
<br />
Umass Program Website<br />
http://www.umassmed.edu/Content.aspx?id=9070

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
1-30-2009
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: October 23, 2007)
Overall rating 
 
7.9
Staff Surgeons 
 
8.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
6.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
5.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
7.0
Location 
 
7.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Great overall training.

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Very personable, allow the residents to get their hands dirty early on and often, and take the time to teach in the OR (especially a few of the younger trauma and sports guys).
Didactics / Teaching
Probably the one legitimate weak point overall. Although they have very strong didactics, morning reports, etc. most are resident run, which has its pluses and minuses. Lots of Miller review, daily trauma and joints case discussions depending on which hospital you're in.
Operating Experience
The best I've seen. The hand and sports rotations are later in your residency, however, which may be a downside depending on your interests.
Clinic Experience
Enough clinic without being overkill. You are always under an attending. There is not "resident clinic" per say, although seniors do book their own cases with attendings as supervisors.
Research Opportunities
If you're interested in basic science or in large functional outcomes data searches its great. The middle ground clinical research is a little less prominent.
Residents
Probably the best thing about the program... a friendly, laid back, hardworking team that's always willing to help a fellow resident when they're getting slammed. Couldn't pick a better group.
Lifestyle
Worcester is not bad if you're single, definitely improving, but its no Boston or New York. Basically a city with a big town feel. Housing is very cheap for Massachusetts, and pretty nice. Some of the surrounding suburbs are beautiful and they're great places to raise a family.
Location / Housing
see above.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Great attendings, friendly residents, large operative loads, very busy but also a fun program to be part of. Overall one of the most solid operative programs I could imagine.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
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