University of Maryland

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John Langland  
 
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8.4 (3)
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Contact Information

City
Baltimore
State/Province
Maryland

Program Information

Residents per class
5
University of Maryland Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
8.4
Staff Surgeons 
 
8.7  (3)
Didactics/Teaching 
 
8.7  (3)
Operating Experience 
 
7.3  (3)
Clinical Experience 
 
8.3  (3)
Research 
 
8.7  (3)
Residents 
 
9.3  (3)
Lifestyle 
 
8.0  (3)
Location 
 
7.7  (3)
Overall Experience 
 
8.7  (3)
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Overall rating 
 
9.0
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
9.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
9.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
8.0
Location 
 
8.0
Overall Experience 
 
10.0

Best of Both Worlds

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
The program has definitely had some key changes throughout the past few years, including a new Chairman and Program Director. That being said however, they were changes in the right direction and everyone you talk to will endorse this - especially the residents. The faculty definitely keep the residents as a top priority and everything they do is focused around resident education and advancing their operative skillset.
Didactics / Teaching
There are weekly didactic sessions every Thursday morning. This is protected resident time and everyone seems to respect this principle (although I had heard that while on trauma, the residents find it a bit more difficult - can not confirm this). During summers, they focus on anatomy including the use of the state anatomy lab. The residents are broken into small groups so that they can get very individualized teaching and practice - often with 2-4 people per body.
Operating Experience
If you ask the residents, this is a key area of improvement over the past few years; especially since the changing of the gaurd in the Chairman and Program Director. Currently, the residents get a fantastic operative experience that really starts during their PGY2 year (although of course like anywhere, the PGY1s have the opportunity to get into the OR quite a bit). If you ask the current Chiefs, they will tell you that their PGY2s' operative skills are years ahead of them compared to when they were a 2.
Clinic Experience
Clinic definitely makes up a big part of the experience at Maryland, but obviously varies from service to service. While at Shock, there was little to no clinic experience at all - you really just operate all day evey day. Yet on services like Sports or Spine, the week is divided rather evenly between OR and clinic. While I was in clinics, I never got the sense that the attendings used the residents to merely blast through patients or finish their notes. There were always teaching moments and the attendings were always great to include both myself and the residents in demonstrating any exam findings or manuevers.
Research Opportunities
There is extensive research opportunity at Maryland, but mostly clinical in nature. I'm sure if you were more focused on the biological or bench-type work, you could find it. However, there are TONS of projects that are always on-going and always need manpower. From residents to medical students, there were always opportunities to be published and involved.
Residents
Fantastic group of people and quite frankly my favorite part of the residency. A great mix of talented, hard working, and genuinely happy people to be around. They hang out together outside the hospital on a regular basis, from sporting events to barbecues to a night out in Baltimore. Just a really good group of people who were always approachable and willing to help.
Lifestyle
I can't comment too much on this. However, when I did see or talk to the residents about this topic, they all seemed very satisfied with their balance of work and play. It really is a happy group of people and I think that this balance plays a critical role in their enjoyable lifestyle and attitude.
Location / Housing
There is plenty of housing around the hospital. Some live within a 2 minute walk to the OR which is extremely convenient but also not in the "prettiest" of areas. Others live like a 15 minute walk to the hospital or a short drive, which will give you a much nicer area to live in as well as convenient transportation. Finally, some live outside the city in a more suburban lifestyle (kids, family, other reasons) but still the commute is manageable.
Limitations
-Hopkins for Pediatrics
-St. Joes for Joints
-Mercy for Foot/Ankle
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
In my opinion, the best of Baltimore. It's the perfect mix of Academics and Operating, Work and Play. The residents are truly happy and enjoy what they do.

Qualification

I am a medical student at this school.
Date of Rotation
2014
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(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
7.7
Staff Surgeons 
 
8.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
8.0
Operating Experience 
 
6.0
Clinical Experience 
 
7.0
Research 
 
8.0
Residents 
 
8.0
Lifestyle 
 
8.0
Location 
 
8.0
Overall Experience 
 
8.0

Spine/ Shock Trauma at UMD

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Dr. Pelligrini was on his way out during my time. Dr Pollack was taken over as interim chair and will probably be appointed fulltime chairman. He is a good guy and has great ideas for the program. According to him the 6th yr is up in the air.

Faculty is otherwise pretty good. The Shock Trauma team is incredible and the highlight of this group. They like to teach and only scrub for difficult cases. There are a lot fo young surgeons in the practice.
Didactics / Teaching
There is daily trauma boards at Shock Trauma that is an incredible learning experience. The traumologists have great discussions on treatment of various fractures, etc. There is also blocked off didactics on Thursdays from 7-11. These lectures were recently revamped and now appear to be well organized but not as polished as the review lectures at other institutions. There are also daily morning conferences, etc that are didactic focused.

There is a great anatomy and sim lab. During the intern yr, one month on Ortho is devoted to "Intern training" where residents get to practice different skill sets. This seemed to be well reviewed by the current interns.

Attendings like to teach; some more than others though. While on Spine it isn't uncommon to just end up watching a case without ever having anything explained to you. So pre-reading is a must to really get the most out of things.
Operating Experience
Though Dean Pollack plans to make some changers and hire more PAs, UMD's operative experience was the worst of the 4 places that I ddi aways. During PGY2 year there is both a Consult and Trauma mule rotation that see no OR time. Even during the PGY4 year I saw residents giving up OR time to junior residents to ensure that clinic was covered. There are fellows on various services that bump residents aside. While on Trauma, if you are there early in the year the fellows do most of the case. Later in the year after they are more confident, the residents get to do much more.

With that said, there are rotations like the VA rotations were PGY2s were scoping knees with the attending unscrubed. So there is definitely a range of operative experiences depending on the rotation that you are on.

There is currently a PGY6 "Super Chief" yr that will be operative heavy and serves to fine-tune residents operating abilities. However this year has yet to be seen, and no one knows exactly what will happen. Most likely residents will be in PG county doing a lot of the cases for underserved patients. The yr is supposed to pay in the $120,000+ range.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is a mixed bag. Once again, some attendings like to teach and some don't. At time you are just working in the same role as the PA/NP. There are clinics in Northern Baltimore (Towson) and outside the city in Columbia. Most days we had to go back to PM round so this was an annoying 30 min (each way) drive for little teaching.
Research Opportunities
Residents didn't talk much about research so I do not know much. I am sure that there are opportunities to do research if you want, but this didn't seem to be a focus outside of the Shock Trauma stuff.
Residents
They are a good bunch. I didn't mesh as well with them as I did at other places but they all seem to hang out at nights/ weekends. Definitely not a malignant group at all.
Lifestyle
Call is pretty easy even during PGY2 year. The residents cover the local high school football games on Friday nights which seems fun. Baltimore is a fun city.
Location / Housing
Most people live in the city in Caton or Federal Hill. The hospital is close to the edge of the city so you could live anywhere.
Limitations
Not the best early operative experience but it is rotation dependent. Some attendings like to teach more than others.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Good place to train. Shock Trauma is an asset. 6th yr is a new idea and is not well planned out at the moment and may never happen (new chairman may nix it). Residents go to Hopkins for Peds in PGY3 which is a plus. Didactics have improved. Call is pretty cush.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
2012
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
8.5
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
7.0
Clinical Experience 
 
9.0
Research 
 
9.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
8.0
Location 
 
7.0
Overall Experience 
 
8.0

University of Maryland

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
The faculty, staff, chairman and program director are all great. Like most places some attendings are more formal and less sociable than others. But definitely not malignant.
Didactics / Teaching
Didactics is known to be a strength at NW. They used to have Saturday AM conference every week but now it is only every other week. Didactics are most days of the week at 6:30 AM, some are service specific, some are for everybody. There is also fx conference at 5PM once/week. Grand rounds/M&M occurs once/week in the morning. Teaching is unparalleled at these conferences. In the OR and clinic, teaching will vary. I would say it's above average, but not superior. NW residents are known to "know their stuff" and do well on OITE. Residents from other chicago programs are often impressed at how much they know.
Operating Experience
Decent operating experience. As an intern on Ortho, you handle the pager and cover the floors. As a two you act mainly as a second assistant (retracting, watching, getting grilled, etc.). Despite this the all the chiefs I spoke with felt very confidant in the OR. Also no one complained about case load. Like most programs there is plenty to go around. I will say that despite this, the Chiefs were still assisting the attendings in most of the cases that I saw. But this is most likely dependent on your rotation. I've heard that while at the VA you'll be operating a lot as a Junior resident and I definitely saw the Chiefs operate autonomously while on Trauma.
Clinic Experience
Great. I was not exposed to everything during my rotation. But from what I saw and heard, the program is very well rounded. You will be exposed to just about everything by the time you're done. I think the only weakness was probably in Foot and Ankle which is not surprising.
Research Opportunities
Plenty of research opportunities, if that is your thing.
Residents
Great group of residents. All are vary socialable, very cohesive. The chiefs definitely knew their stuff. The residents were definitely 1 of the many highlights of the rotation.
Lifestyle
Decent lifestyle. Mainly depends on what rotation you're on. Definitely longer hours on Trauma and total joints. Less on sports and upper extremity. Depending on the rotation your day usually begins around 5:30-6:30am and ends ~5-7pm. As a rotator, I spent 2 weeks on upper extremity. During my time I was in by 6:30 and usually done by 5pm-6pm. A few times I was done by 4:30pm!
Location / Housing
Well it is Baltimore. If you've been there before then you know what I am thinking. Far from being the prettiest or cleanest city. It is a great city once you know where to go and definitely where not to go. And great if you have a lot of friends and family in the area. But if you don't then you will probably be disappointed. The plus is DC is 30min away and the Wash/MD/VA has tons of places to go and plenty of things to do. You'll have no problem finding stuff to do with your precious spare time.
Limitations
Operative experience overall may leave you "needing" a fellowship. This isn't just my opinion. I have heard this from many people and seen it first hand to some degree. This is not a research powerhouse but you will have no problem finding opportunities. They don't have many "big names" but they have a few.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Great rotation. I'd encourage anyone interested in going to there to rotate there. In general, UMD is far from a malignant program. The attendings are very nice and socialable but I will admit that some are very formal. There certainly is a dichotomy between the residents and the attending but yet still very benign. Something that I thought that brought down my rating was the operative experience. You're independence and comfortably in the OR probably doesn't really come until you're a PGY-4 or 5. As stated before, as a PGY-2 you are mainly retracting/watching or still handling floor work and consults while on the Spine service. As a PGY-3 on Trauma, you'll work up the patient but most of the operating is done by the fellows and chiefs. After interviewing at other places I realized that some PGY-2's have vastly different operating experience and may be 1st assits. So it all really depends on whether you prefer to get your hands dirty earlier in residency or late.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
October 2007
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