Ochsner Clinic Foundation Program

Ochsner Clinic Foundation Program Hot

John LanglandJohn Langland   August 16, 2007  
 
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8.9 (3)
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Contact Information

City
New Orleans
State/Province
Louisiana

Program Information

Residents per class
2
Ochsner Clinic Foundation Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
8.9
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.3  (3)
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.3  (3)
Operating Experience 
 
10.0  (3)
Clinical Experience 
 
8.7  (3)
Research 
 
5.7  (3)
Residents 
 
9.7  (3)
Lifestyle 
 
9.7  (3)
Location 
 
8.3  (3)
Overall Experience 
 
9.3  (3)
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(Updated: March 26, 2017)
Overall rating 
 
9.5
Staff Surgeons 
 
10.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
10.0
Research 
 
7.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
9.0
Location 
 
10.0
Overall Experience 
 
10.0

Ochsner 2016

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
PD- Meyer (Tumor). All around awesome guy that will do anything for the residency program. As someone mentioned he is a master of pimping (in a good way) and is an excellent surgeon/ role model. As a rotating student he knew everything about me before I arrived and was very interactive with me in clinic. This was a pleasant surprise after several other away rotations. Saw him do a proximal humerus replacement in what seemed like 30 minutes. Gives the residents tons of autonomy while in the OR with them. Lots of tumor referrals from all over the state as Ochsner is a very large hospital system.

Joints- Chimento (Chairman), Ochsner, Waddell. Wadell is a former Ochsner resident that recently returned after doing fellowship at HSS. He was great to work with and brings more direct anterior experience to the program as well as complex revisions. Ridiculous amount of joint experience here. Saw 3rd year residents absolutely crushing total knees.

Trauma- Mautner. Not tons of hot trauma here but residents definitely get plenty of trauma experience. Mautner is a master trauma surgeon and really takes the time to teach residents. He does some of the best fracture work I have seen. You will leave here feeling comfortable taking general ortho trauma call.

Hand: Only worked with Sisco-Wise but they have several other hand/upper ext. staff. She runs several rooms each day and has a very busy clinic. Lets the upper level residents fly in the OR.

Sports: Suri, Jones, Montgomery. Cover the new Orleans Saints. If you've ever been to New Orleans the Saints are huugggee and the fact that Ochsner covers them speaks to the quality of Ocsher Orthopedics and the residency program as a whole.

Spine/Peds: Did not spend any time on these services but did meet the staff and they were good people. Residents speak highly of these rotations.
Didactics / Teaching
630 daily conference where the team runs the trauma list from the previous day and then has a didactic conference. Good didactic sessions prepare residents well for the OITE.
Operating Experience
I cannot say enough about the operating experience here. Due to the smaller size of the program you are in the OR from day one, not doing 1-2 years of floor work as some other places. Third year residents were comfortable as a primary surgeon on primary TKA's and the fours and fives were the most competent that I saw anywhere on the trail. I saw a two and a three knock out an IM nail skin to skin sub 20 minutes.

As a 4 and 5 you spend six months at a community hospital about 45 minutes south of New Orleans (housing is provided). You and one other resident are THE orthopedists at the hospital while you are there. You run your own clinic and book your own cases. You are primary surgeon with a PA assisting you on your cases. Like joints? Book more joints cases. Enjoy sports? Do more arthroscopy. I spent one day in Chabert with one of the residents and did several joints as well a pilon fracture (residents cover the operative trauma cases that come through the ED). He also showed me images of a post-op distal femur replacement that he recently did. Yes that's right a distal femur replacement as a resident.

Also doing robotic assisted surgeries here with some of the total joints especially unicompartmental knees. I see this possibly being the wave of the future and I like having the option to train with this as a resident.
Clinic Experience
Clinic is clinic, you will get enough of it. As a four and five you in Chabert you will be running your own clinic often seeing upwards of 40 patients a day and coming up with their treatment plan. You are THE GUY while in Chabert and will be deciding if you will be operating on them or treating them conservatively. You will be ready to go into private practice or pursue fellowship if you train here.
Research Opportunities
This is not a research powerhouse but you will get publications here. Increasing research presence in the past few years and I believe they will get stronger in the coming years in the research department.

Residents
Awesome group of residents that are very tight. Smaller program but doesn't feel too small. Everyone gets along well and seems like they were truly happy to be at work. Seems like the get together pretty regularly outside of work.
Lifestyle
Pretty typical for an orthopedic program. Start early but finish at a reasonable time each day. Life is not dominated by trauma call and it seemed like most residents did have a good life outside work.

Moonlighting in the ED is allowed from 3rd year on and you can work up to two nights a month at about $1000 a shift. Not bad for extra cash flow.
Location / Housing
Lets be honest New Orleans is probably one of the greatest cities in the world. World class music, food, bar scene and culture. Jazz festival, Mardi Gras, French Quarter Festival, Voodoo Festival, Poboy Festival.... the list is endless. There is a parade or festival for everything. Mardi Gras is a hospital holiday ie no scheduled cases. This place gets it. People live and die New Orleans Saints here and it is contagious.
Limitations
Not a research powerhouse but still plenty of research happening here. If you want to make it happen it will happen. Residents have enough publications to obtain solid fellowship positions.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
I had an excellent rotation here and ranked it very highly due to the reasons above. Operative experience here is ridiculous and is the main reason why this place shines.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
2016
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(Updated: December 12, 2011)
Overall rating 
 
8.1
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
4.0
Residents 
 
9.0
Lifestyle 
 
10.0
Location 
 
5.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Ochsner Orthopaedics

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Staff: every sub-specialty within orthopedics is covered. Strengths here are total joints and sports; less trauma heavy compared to some programs at busy level 1 centers. Overall we are a smaller program (2 or 3 residents per year).

Chairman: Brand new Chairman from Mayo clinic (Duncan). Previous chair (Warren) is still around but nearing retirement. Chairman Emeritus (Kaye) is also still around and soon retiring. Sometimes a new chairman can be a sign of turmoil in a program- but not here, where we have 2 retired chairmen still practicing. Both previous chairmen have good relationships with hospital admin and were simply ready to relinquish the responsibilities.

Sports: Jones, Suri, Montgomery
Ochsner covers the New Orleans Saints (Dr. Jones) and the New Orleans Hornets (Dr. Montgomery); we have 2 sports fellows, so the sports resident rotates as the “3rd fellow” meaning you will get outstanding, individualized experience in all things arthroscopy related.

Spine: Zavatsky
Very busy service; wide range of adult pathology, occasional pedi spine but this is mostly done while rotating at the children’s hospital

Hand/ Upper Ext.: Duncan, Sisco, Kaye
Good experience with basic hand and wrist pathology as well as shoulder / elbow. Different generational perspectives and approaches between the staff make for a great educational experience.

Trauma: Mautner
Again this is not a high volume trauma center but we do get more than enough transfers and referrals from all over LA and MS. It’s mostly “cold” trauma when talking about pelvis and acetabular injuries. Plenty of bread and butter trauma coming through the ER. Similar to most single specialty private groups, the other attendings refer their “on call” trauma to Dr. Mautner so they can tend to their sub specialty practice.

Foot/Ankle: Treuting
There are plenty of stinky feet to examine with Dr. Treuting… who is very easy to get along with… you will do everything from ankle arthroscopy to TTC arthrodesis.

Oncology: Meyer
Again the residents past and present can’t say enough good things about Dr. Meyer. He is brilliant. And just when you think you know something about musculoskeletal oncology, he will put you in your place. He is a true master of pimping. As long as he is a part of resident education at Ochsner, this will remain a superior place to train.
His practice is supplemented with routine adult reconstruction when he is not taking out osteosarcomas and the like.

Joints: Chimento, Ochsner
Most residents will leave this program able to TEACH primary hip and knee arthroplasty. Dr. Ochsner and Chimento are both outstanding in different ways. Dr. Chimento has become the local THA and TKA revision expert and gets plenty of distant referrals. The downside to the service is rounding on all of the inpatients, but the operative experience is worth it. Often you are in the OR 5 days a week on this service (1 resident : 2 staff)

Peds: Warren, Waldron
The service covers basic pediatric orthopedics. This is supplemented with a 3 month rotation during PGY-3 at Children’s hospital of New Orleans with the staff from LSU.
Didactics / Teaching
OITE scores ~90%tile consistantly. This doesn't mean the residents are "smarter" than those other programs, but we have required academic time to prepare for boards- balancing service with education.

PD- Dr. Mark Meyer is probably nicest, most intelligent, and most down to earth PD in the nation. He makes sure that our academic time is protected.

We have daily (M-F) didactic sessions from 6:15-7:30am. Monthly journal club. Required quarterly Arthroscopy "wet labs" (2-3 residents per cadaver). Bi-Monthly cadaveric dissections in the morgue.

All expense paid required meetings:
PGY2- AO Basic Fracture Course
PGY3- Enneking Tumor Review
PGY4- Dallas short course Orthootics/Prosthetics
PGY5- AAOS or any elective course
Operating Experience
Tons...
Clinic Experience
Adequate. You are not going into ortho for the clinic work.
Research Opportunities
This is somewhat limited relative to other BIG TIME research places. We dont have a team of PH.D.'s waiting around the lab with projects waiting for you. We dont have x million dollars in NIH grants. If you want to produce papers, we have the essentials but not all the bells and whistles.

1 publishable paper is required before you can finish residency.
Residents
More importantly, all of the residents are happy with their experience and get along great.

They have consistantly obtained Fellowships at top notch institutions... some recent ones include: Harvard- Trauma (2), CHOP- Peds, MD Anderson- Oncology among others. About half go into practice (military or private) and half do fellowships, although the nationwide trend is towards fellowship training.
Lifestyle
No one goes into ortho for the lifestyle… BUT I would say the general lifestyle of the ortho residents here is balanced relative to many other programs. ACGME rules are strictly enforced (for better or worse).
Location / Housing
New Orleans is the true origin of the term "dirty south". Most people love it here. Some hate it. There is a lot of crime, political corruption and the public schools systems are crap. Private schools are expensive but worth it, if you have kids.

The night life is unlimited (literally there is no "last call") and there is a drive-thru daiquiri right across the street from the hospital.

For New Orleans in general, the food is unparalleled and the unique culture make it a special place. Did I mention that Mardi Gras is an official hospital holiday?
Limitations
1)Research (see above)
2)One short out-of-town rotation (but ALL of the residents view the Chabert rotation as a strength, plus its an easy 1hr commute)
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Ochsner Ortho was formerly known as a "country club" program 15 years ago. Significant growth and academic emphasis had changed us into a regionally (maybe nationally?) recognized institution that is very well respected. (FYI- I had not heard of this institution until I started applying for residency).

For Current applicants considering away rotations: As with many programs, you VASTLY improve your chances of matching here by performing well on a visiting 4th year elective at Ochsner. We take 2 or 3 residents per year and most years at least one rotated with us as a 4th year med student. Recent match statistics- ~500 applications, ~35 interviews, matched 2 of our top 5 ranked applicants. The match doesn’t always work that well per se, but it gives you an idea of the competitiveness of orthopaedics in general (not just at our institution).

A note on Hurricane Katrina in 2005: Ochsner didn’t close for a single day. The hospital is situated next to the Mississippi river levy and didn’t even come close to flooding. There was no exodus of staff or residents post Katrina. In fact, Ochsner has purchased several other hospitals in the post Katrina era. Other academic teaching hospitals weren’t so lucky (e.g. LSU, Tulane), but overall the city has completely recovered despite what the media may say. For example, in 2012 New Orleans is hosting- Sugar Bowl, BCS national championship, NCAA Final Four, among others… in 2013 the super bowl… In 2014, the AAOS annual meeting.
Also, we share a strong camaraderie and mutual respect with the residents from LSU and Tulane since we all work together at Childrens hospital, and we frequently share city wide lectures/conferences/professorships.

Qualification

I am an alumnus of this program.
Date of Rotation
2012
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(Updated: January 01, 2012)
Overall rating 
 
9.1
Staff Surgeons 
 
9.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
10.0
Operating Experience 
 
10.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
6.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
10.0
Location 
 
10.0
Overall Experience 
 
9.0

Ochsner Orthopaedics Resident Review

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
We have roughly 14 staff and we are covered in every specialty. There are 2 total joint guys, 3 hand/upper extremity specialists, 3 sports, 1 tumor, 1 foot/ankle, 1 traumatologist, 2 peds, and 1 spine. We have essentially a 1:1 faculty to resident ratio. Our new chairman is an upper extremity specialist from the Mayo Clinic who will add more of an academic flavor to our program. Our program director is a tumor guy who bends over backwards to make sure residents are receiving the most of their training. Our sports guys cover the New Orleans Saints and Hornets and a bunch of other professional, college and high school teams.
Didactics / Teaching
We have morning conference every morning from 6:15 to 7:30am beginning with trauma conference followed by a didactic session. There is reading every night for conference in addition to the reading you have to do to prepare for your cases. The 2nd years take the brunt of the “pimping” but none of our conferences are by any means malignant. Daily conference has helped us perform phenomenally well on the OITE each year. As a program we are consistently scoring in the mid-90th percentile. In addition to daily conference are grand rounds every Wednesday. We also have M&M and Staff fracture conference, and journal club once a month.
Operating Experience
Our program is unique in that it's for the most part structured to be a preceptorship. Each resident is assigned to a faculty member meaning you are the intern, resident, and upper level on your “service”. Therefore you are doing all of the cases one on one with your attending. Either you are first assisting him or he/she is first assisting you. Double scrubbing with other residents and fighting over cases or getting cases stolen from you by an upper level is nonexistent at our program. Looking back at my case logs, I have consistently done an average of 8 cases/week thus far and I couldn’t be happier with this aspect of our training. As a 4th and 5th year you spend 4-6 months at Chabert Hospital, a public hospital 1 hour away (housing provided) in Houma, LA. Here you are the essentially THE orthopedist for the hospital. You run your own clinic, book your own cases, operate independently, and see your patients in follow up. Therefore by the time you are a 4th year your operative and clinical skills are strong enough for you to be out on your own without supervision (unless of course you need it).
Clinic Experience
Clinic is about 1-2x week. Again we are a preceptorship so you are one on one with the attending here. You learn on the fly and again, by the time you are a PGY4 or 5 rotating at Chabert Hospital, you will be ready to see 50 patients in one clinic day independently.
Research Opportunities
Thus far this has been one of our weaker areas. We are certainly not a research powerhouse. Some of our staff are heavily involved in research and some are really not at all. Residents are required to complete at least 1 publishable project during residency. Many do much more and present at multiple conferences throughout their residency. Others wait till the last second to do their one required project. I think with the addition of our new chairman, research will be more highly emphasized. We certainly have the resources you would need right at our hospital – a statistics department, a medical publisher in house who can guide you through your project and proofread before you submit it to a journal, ample case volume, and medical students who can do the busy work.
Residents
Everyone is very nice and down to earth. Most of us are from the Southeast but we are trying to get more people from other regions to find out about us. Half of us are married/engaged and half are single. We are not a program where everyone goes out to the same place every Friday night and if you don’t go you are lame. Some residents go out, some stay home to be with their family. Everyone gets along and has respect for one another. I can honestly say you will not meet an unhappy Ochsner resident.
Lifestyle
Many people would call us a cushy program. I think that’s probably accurate when I compare us to other programs. We read and learn a ton but we also operate a ton and still make it home at a reasonable hour of the day. We have little scutwork at our program and everything is very streamlined as we have PAs, and knowledgeable floor nurses that don’t page you about nonsense. Rarely do you ever reach anywhere near the 80 hour work week except when you are the trauma resident. On that rotation you operate until your fingers are calloused. Our call is home call and we are not a level-one trauma center but call can be very busy at times. 2nd years take the most call (7-8/month) followed by 3rd years (4-5/month). As a junior resident you are guaranteed 2 weekends a month off and ACGME rules are strictly regulated. As a 4th and 5th year you take no primary call unless you are at Chabert Hospital. You essentially have every weekend off.
Moonlighting is also permitted in our own ER and you can essentially earn $1,000 a night after taxes but you can only do it twice a month.
Location / Housing
New Orleans is a city that you either hate or love – there’s no in between. When I first arrived in New Orleans I fell in love with the city immediately – the music, the food, the people, the cheap cost of living. I was here for Katrina, the evacuation, and the rebuilding and I can honestly say that New Orleans is bigger and badder than it’s ever been. We are not still under water or covered in an oil spill as the mass media still portrays us as. This is a great city for single people or married people. There are tons of bars, clubs, restaurants, parks, shopping, festivals. Something is always going on for everybody. We have the sugar bowl and the BCS championship a few days away right downtown! It feels like a big city here but New Orleans is pretty small. I live uptown about a 6 minute drive from the hospital around a bunch of nice restaurants and shopping.
Most residents live uptown, but Ochsner also has a bunch of houses that it leases to residents that are right next to the hospital. Some residents with families will choose to live out in the suburbs of Metairie or Kenner where you get a little more space and suburban feel. When you are out at Chabert Hospital in Houma we are put up in apartments by the hospital. Many residents drive home on the weekends if they are not on call and some residents commute from New Orleans to Houma at times.
Limitations
We are not a level-1 trauma center so your residency is not dominated by trauma call. Therefore your call is lighter and you don’t see much “hot” trauma for those of you who may want this in your program. We are however a tertiary referral center in the biggest hospital system in Louisiana so we get plenty of complex trauma (pelvic/acetabulum, pilons, plateaus, polytraumas) that are shipped into us from other surrounding hospitals. Academics and research is not a highlight of our program but this will probably change in the near future.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Again I am a current resident and this post is probably biased. I can honestly tell you that you will not meet an unhappy Ochsner resident. If you are looking for tons of operative and clinical experience and excellent didactics throughout the duration of your residency and want to graduate with the ability to go out into practice right out of residency or get a great fellowship not out of necessity then you should really check us out. Many of our current residents were rotators as well who saw first-hand what we had to offer. Send me a PM if I can answer any questions.

Qualification

I am a current resident of this program.
Date of Rotation
2009-2014
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