Loyola University Hot

John LanglandJohn Langland   August 15, 2007  
 
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7.2 (3)
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Contact Information

City
Maywood
State/Province
Illinois

Program Information

Residents per class
5
Loyola University Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program

User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
7.2
Staff Surgeons 
 
6.3  (3)
Didactics/Teaching 
 
7.7  (3)
Operating Experience 
 
6.3  (3)
Clinical Experience 
 
8.7  (3)
Research 
 
5.0  (3)
Residents 
 
9.0  (3)
Lifestyle 
 
7.3  (3)
Location 
 
8.0  (3)
Overall Experience 
 
6.3  (3)
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(Updated: July 20, 2017)
Overall rating 
 
6.0
Staff Surgeons 
 
5.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
7.0
Operating Experience 
 
4.0
Clinical Experience 
 
10.0
Research 
 
4.0
Residents 
 
8.0
Lifestyle 
 
5.0
Location 
 
7.0
Overall Experience 
 
4.0

Loyola (Rotator)

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
New chairman, Dr. Ghanayem, succeeded Dr. Light. Dr. Light was a true asset to the program and remains around semi-retired for the benefit of the residents. Dr. Ghanayem still seems to be getting his bearings as a chairman, but he appeared to approach the program in a very different way. He maintains a strict sense of hierarchy among residents to the extent that I found Juniors and some seniors were intimidated by him, which is to the detriment of resident experience and advocacy. Many residents had horror stories of interactions with him and it felt like a rite of passage. I found this be a less than optimal relationship to have with one's chair, considering at LUC the chair performs many of the daily resident management duties that PDs perform in other places. Other staff vary, with some attendings taking an interest in residents and others not. Dr. Wu is nice, relatively newly appointed as PD but appeared a bit distant from residents for a PD. Dr. Nystrom who is relatively new and the coordinator for outside rotators is excellent and takes a special interest in teaching.
Didactics / Teaching
Didactics were well organized. They consist of a dedicated didactic day which was a model I liked as opposed to daily didactics as it really allowed for more OR time for the residents. Residents seemed to be satisfied with the didactics experience overall. Residents do fine overall on OITE.
Operating Experience
Level one trauma center in strategic location means high volume trauma which has great potential for training. Operating experience overall was very attending depends. With some, I saw senior residents stuck retracting, but sometimes junior residents were walked through cases which was great to see. Overall, I felt that majority of attendings took the lead with residents assisting. This mostly involved setting up the room before the attending arrives, retracting during the case, and closure. This was worse on spine, where senior residents didn't do much besides some of the exposure.
Clinic Experience
Clinical experience is well organized and good. Residents take the lead here and get the full experience. There are a number of satellite facilities that residents may sometimes end up needing to go to, but with Chicago traffic it's not fun commuting to these places. At the VA, residents run the show but medical students really get to do a lot.
Research Opportunities
Research opportunities are there. There are bench researchers who do take residents as well as intradisciplinary research which is excellent. Overall, residents don't choose Loyola for its research and they don't seem particularly interested in it, but for those who like it, there are opportunities.
Residents
Residents are an excellent group overall. They get along well with good camaraderie. They definitely have a work-hard play-hard attitude. I could definitely see my self getting along with them.
Lifestyle
Lifestyle seems less then average. On trauma and Joints months, it can get very busy with residents in the ER most of trauma season. Night float system makes night coverage much better. Proximity to Chicago is a huge plus and many residents commute from the city, but you also can easily commute from the suburbs if that's what you'd prefer. Mix between married and non-married residents, with juniors most often being non-married.
Location / Housing
Loyola is in Maywood, IL and in an area that is not safe, so one would need to commute from Chicago or the suburbs which means you'll need to have a minimum 20-30 minute commute. Residents seem to live everywhere. Cost of living in chicago can be high, but it's a large city and may be worth it to some.
Limitations
Residents are great bunch and get along well, however there is a homogeneity of the group.
Fellowship placement seems fine but I did see some residents express concern they would not match into a fellowship which was a very surprising thing to hear.
Volume can be low on some services, with some services combined (e.g. spine/oncology) due to lack of volume.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
LUC is a program which will train you to be an adequate surgeon. For a trajectory into private practice, it provides satisfactory training in a world-class city. Malignancy from the chair and variable surgical experience are a big downside.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
2017
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(Updated: January 30, 2013)
Overall rating 
 
7.8
Staff Surgeons 
 
7.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
7.0
Operating Experience 
 
8.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
6.0
Residents 
 
10.0
Lifestyle 
 
8.0
Location 
 
9.0
Overall Experience 
 
7.0

Loyola University- Visiting Medical Student

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Dr. Light is the chairman and he is a nationally known hand guy. He's very nice and approachable. The trauma guys knew their stuff and made sure the residents did as well during fracture rounds in the AM. Dr. Pinzur is their foot/ankle surgeon and he is probably the best out of the entire group. He gives residents great autonomy and really knows his stuff. Hopkinson is the PD who's also a military guy and is wonderful to work with. He gives the residents great autonomy and is really nice.
Didactics / Teaching
Both faculty and residents are involved. These are probably average. The residents are frequently put on the spot, which I think forces them to learn the material beforehand. Personally, I like that, but others probably will not.
Operating Experience
Excellent on Hand, Foot/ankle, and joints. Sports is probably average to slightly below average. Trauma varies with the attending you're with. Summers is a Harborview trained surgeon who gives great autonomy while Stover does not. Stover, however, does more complex hip cases and gets referrals from other Ortho programs in Chicago. Overall, the operative experience is probably average.
Clinic Experience
They did a few days of clinic per week. Residents saw patients and presented to the attendings so the autonomy was excellent. I think it was an appropriate amount of clinic.
Research Opportunities
Research is limited to spine per one of the faculty I interviewed with at the end of the month.
Residents
They are a wonderful group of guys and gals. It is a female friendly program. They get along really well both inside and outside the hospital.
Lifestyle
Lifestyle is probably about average. They work harder than Rush/NW/U of C, but I'm not sure about UIC. They have a nightfloat system which makes it easier on the residents overall. When on call, they also have to cover the VA which is within walking distance of the main hospital.
Location / Housing
The hospital is in Maywood which isn't the safest place to live. Most of the residents commute from other suburbs that are more family friendly. The hospital is nice and it is only about 20 minutes from downtown with minimal traffic. It's a level 1 trauma center so residents get a good experience of blunt and penetrating trauma.
Limitations
They need to add more faculty in a few of their sub-specialties--namely spine and foot/ankle. Also, although Loyola is a level 1 trauma center, the residents did not get much autonomy in the OR while on this service. I met another medical student on the interview trail who agreed with my assessment of their trauma service. They can also expand their research opportunities.
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Loyola is an average Orthopedic program that is not very academic in nature. If you feel that you want a program with great residents, minimal research requirements, and excellent training in hand and foot/ankle, look at this program. They have good fellowship placement too.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
Sept 2010
Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: October 23, 2007)
Overall rating 
 
7.8
Staff Surgeons 
 
7.0
Didactics/Teaching 
 
9.0
Operating Experience 
 
7.0
Clinical Experience 
 
8.0
Research 
 
5.0
Residents 
 
9.0
Lifestyle 
 
9.0
Location 
 
8.0
Overall Experience 
 
8.0

Loyola Review

Program Review

Staff / Faculty / Chairman
Terry Light is the chairman. He strikes me as a good guy and he is a very well known hand surgeon. I think he has a good relationship with fellow faculty and residents and he seems to be very dedicated to improving and growing as a program. I liked how they had "chairman's hour" amongst other lectures on Thur. mornings. This was a time in which they took care of houskeeping and gave people a chance to speek up about issues. A very collegial and warm, open environment. All faculty seemed to be approachable, good with students, patients and dedicated to their work. They have a few gems in their program like Dr. Bednar, a big hand guy, Dr. Hopkinson, a military trained wonderful, very respectable joint guy, Dr. Marra, a young columbia shoulder trained awesome surgeon and teacher. I know spine and trauma are solid too but I didn't get to know them as well. It's a very solid group but they have had some turnover lately.
Didactics / Teaching
One of their strengths. Protected Thursday mornings consisting of high quality lectures delivered by residents, faculty and guests. Like I said, they have chairman's hour as well which is nice. Lecture schedule is planned out in advance and very organized and relevant.
Operating Experience
Some say operative experience is only solid in the area of trauma at this program. I think it's safe to say trauma is an excellent experience, wide variety of cases, level 1, great attendings, etc. All other operative experiences are probably average. I observed 4 people often scrubed on joints cases. There are a bunch of young attendings so perhaps they are a little more apprehensive to let residents do the whole case. This has to be taken with a grain of salt though as a 4 wk rotation is just a snapshot. I'd say based on what I saw and heard, operative experience is average, but on trauma it's excellent.
Clinic Experience
Probably a strong point. Residents and med students get nice autonomy. Nice facilities. Great help from nurses and staff. Fair amount of teaching. Hosital has all computerized med records and notes which is great!
Research Opportunities
This is a clear weakness, but you can certainly find things to do. There is some infrastructure, just not a focus. They do have a 20 week!!! research rotation which is cush! Residents love it. They will even support you to go overseas. One resident as a 3 went to south africa and had his own OR for one month.
Residents
An obvious strength. I'd say they have above average knowledge and excellent personalities and cohesion. They get high marks for this category. A fun group to work with.
Lifestyle
Pretty cush I'd say. Could be a downside though. I think with turnover of attendings, there was a slight shortage of work lately and residents really should have been busier. However, I think these residents still get the training they need, are very happy, and have a nice lifestyle.
Location / Housing
Well, it's in a western suburb of Chicago about 20 min from downtown with no traffic. That area itself is not nice, but most people live in the City and as most people agree, Chicago is a top notch city. You can just consider Loyola as being a Chicago program. You will reap all the benefits of the city. If you want to live a little closer to the hospital, try Oak Park, the quaint suburb known for its Frank Lloyd Wright houses and young, diverse population.
Limitations
Faculty turnover, minimal research, not a big name program
Overall Rotation Experience / Conclusion
Overall, it was a wonderful experience. As we know, you have to find the program that fits you. This program is for the person wanting friendly, humane attendings, a great bunch of residents who will have your back, a nice lifestyle, great didactics, proximity to a world class city, and to come out as a solid surgeon with the option to get a good fellowship. They have some good pipelines in hand, shoulder, sports (columbia, Kerlan-jobe). Don't pick this program if you want "big names", extreme prestige, big NIH funding, and a more stuffy environment (hey, some people like that). This program is looked very favorably upon especially in the midwest. If it's your flavor, I think it's a really, really nice place. They are building a new OR building. They have a great gym right on campus. Everything is in close proximity. You get to work at VA and shriners. Again, a solid, solid program.

Qualification

I rotated as a medical student at this program
Date of Rotation
2007
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