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TOPIC: Personal statement question

8 years 5 months ago #30080

  • kdburton
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A couple books I've flipped through said that part of a plain and sane personal statement is to talk about your goals in terms of what you intend to do you in your career. I don't know I would want to sub-specialize in at this point and I don't know whether I'd be primarily interested in academic or private practice. How important is it to include this kind of information in your personal statement?
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What books are you looking 8 years 5 months ago #18986

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What books are you looking at to get ERAS personal statement advice? In general, what do we focus on in personal statements for Ortho residency. I don't have any amazing Ortho story or anything, just a genuine interest in the field. I feel really lost with this PS compared to my AMCAS statement 4 years ago.
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Re: Personal statement question 8 years 5 months ago #18988

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A couple books I've flipped through said that part of a plain and sane personal statement is to talk about your goals in terms of what you intend to do you in your career. I don't know I would want to sub-specialize in at this point and I don't know whether I'd be primarily interested in academic or private practice. How important is it to include this kind of information in your personal statement?

I've seen quite a few of your posts here on orthogate and the best advice I can give you if you want to match is to chill out. The large majority of your posts, this one being a prime example, focus on the most trivial details that really don't matter much, if at all. Your energy would be best spent at just learning anatomy, working hard, staying late, being enthusiastic, and just acting like a normal person who is easy to get along with.

Why get a book to tell you how to write a personal statement then worry whether or not to include their potential career goals 40 years from now? Write something that actually is important to you and not something scripted from a how-to book.

For those of you wondering what to write about for a good PS, the best advice I can give is to write a story about yourself and why ortho would be a good fit for you. We dont want to read solely about your competetive grades, board scores, etc. like a modified CV, and we also dont want some random story that has no relationship to orthopedics. Tell us who you are in a way that captivates our attention and why you are interested and why you will be successful in this field. Remember, we will be flipping through hundreds of these, so you want to make yours memorable. Finally, have everyone you know proof read it for you and make corrections/suggestions...family, friends, classmates, mentors, anyone. The more people the better.

Oh, and one thing that has come up in years past is length - I would recommend 1 page, no longer.
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First Aid for the Match 8 years 5 months ago #18989

  • kdburton
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First Aid for the Match and Iserson's Getting into a Residency are the books I was skimming. They just have a small section on general personal statement tips. I don't have any spectacular story that lead me to want to go into orthopedics either so I was thinking about going with just a conservative personal statement that covers the basics - however I don't know if or how important it really is to talk about your career goals (especially when the majority of us will probably change our mind between now and then).
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My PD said, its not 8 years 5 months ago #18990

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My PD said, its not best to mention anywhere in your PS that you desire to sub-specialize in such n such a field in ortho, because what if the program reading your PS very rarely matches their residents into that particular fellowship? Automatically you've given them a reason to think that you won't be compatible/or a good match for their program.
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Just tell the truth. No 8 years 5 months ago #18991

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Just tell the truth. No one is going to judge you because you don't have some amazing story about how you were a D1 athlete and tore your ACL blah blah blah. Just talk about you, what your path was until now that got you interested in ortho, why you are a good candidate, what your broad goals are for the future, etc. Talk about a case that you scrubbed in on that you really enjoyed or a clinic that you attended where you saw how ortho helped people.
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