Orthopedic News for Patients - Bone & Joint Pain

News for patients with orthopedic conditions & bone and joint pain.

By Mayo Clinic Staff Knee replacement surgery — also known as knee arthroplasty (ARTH-row-plas-tee) — can help relieve pain and restore function in severely diseased knee joints. During knee replacement, a surgeon cuts away damaged bone and cartilage from your thighbone, shinbone and kneecap and replaces it with an artificial joint made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics and polymers. The first artificial knees were little more than crude hinges. Now, you and your doctor can choose from a variety of designs that take into account your age, weight, activity level and overall health. Most knee replacement joints attempt to act like your knee, with its ability to roll and glide as it bends.

Read more ...

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplements didn't relieve pain or slow the progression of knee osteoarthritis in a new study, even though the patients involved had low levels of the vitamin. Osteoarthritis is a progressive disease, and currently no treatment is available that will stop the loss of cartilage. Eventually, many patients are headed for knee replacements, the Australian researchers said. "These data suggest a lack of evidence to support vitamin D supplementation for slowing disease progression or structural change in knee osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Changhai Ding, a professor at the University of Tasmania in Hobart.

Read more ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindful meditation may offer a measure of pain relief to seniors suffering from chronic lower back pain, new research suggests. The study involved nearly 300 older adults with long-term lower back pain, half of whom were assigned to a two-month mindful meditation course. "Mindfulness meditation is a method to learn how to be fully engaged in the present moment and not let the mind get so easily distracted," explained study lead author Dr. Natalia Morone. She is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. As patients practiced mindfulness meditation and tried to stay more focused on the present moment, "participants found they experienced less pain," Morone said.

Read more ...

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Surgeons often recommend outpatient physical therapy to help hip replacement patients get moving again, but researchers report that a home exercise program may work just as well. Experts say that physical therapy plays a vital role in recovery after hip replacement. And this new study of 77 patients found they obtained similar results no matter which therapy option they pursued after receiving their new hip. "Our research found that the physical therapy does not necessarily need to be supervised by a physical therapist [for hip replacement patients]," said study author Dr.

Read more ...

Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Read more ...

Fast FactsStudying twins has proven very helpful in examining the genetic and environmental influences that may cause rheumatic disease.Ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis appear to have identifiable genes that play a substantial role in passing the disease to a child.Recent findings are leading to new knowledge about the causes of arthritis diseases that could potentially lead to new treatment strategies in the future.The clustering of multiple and different autoimmune diseases is observed frequently in the same families, suggesting existence of shared susceptibility genes among these diseases. Note: Because of the technical nature of this topic, you may wish to consult with your physician if you have questions after reading this information.

Read more ...

To prevent complications after surgery, there are some positions you should avoid.

Read more ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A procedure that uses radio waves to treat chronic low back pain provided long-lasting relief to a small group of patients, researchers report. Called intradiscal biacuplasty (IDB), the procedure uses two water-cooled needles to blast radiofrequency energy at the nerve fibers within and around a spinal disc that's begun to degenerate but has not ruptured, explained lead researcher Dr. Michael Gofeld. "Basically you're destroying the nerve fibers, which will lead to the elimination of pain," he said. Gofeld is a chronic pain management specialist at St. Michael's Hospital and Women's College Hospital in Toronto.

Read more ...

Skip to Content Video: "Making Arrangements for Recovery" It's important to prepare for your recovery before you have hip replacement surgery.

Read more ...